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Montgomery Community College Catalog

 

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Montgomery Community College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award associate degrees, diplomas, and certificates.  Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Montgomery Community College.

The Commission may be contacted for the following reasons:  1) to learn about the accreditation status of Montgomery Community College,  2) to file a third party comment at the time of the Montgomery Community College decennial review,  3) to file a complaint against Montgomery Community College for significant non-compliance with a standard or requirement.

Normal inquiries about Montgomery Community College, such as admission requirements, financial aid, educational programs, etc., should be addressed directly to Montgomery Community College and not to the Commission on Colleges.


GENERAL CATALOG
Montgomery Community College issues this catalog to furnish information about the institution and its programs. The College makes every effort to meet the needs and desires of its students. However, special circumstances may require the College to cancel classes or programs due to insufficient enrollment or funding. Montgomery Community College reserves the right to make such decisions as warranted. Therefore, the provisions set forth in this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the student and the College. The College also reserves the right at any time to request that a student withdraw when such action is considered to be in the best interest of the student or the institution.



VISITORS
Visitors to the College are welcome during normal operating hours to attend outside events hosted by the College and to visit the College Library. During normal operating hours, visitors should register at the Information Desk upon arrival on campus. Loitering is strictly prohibited and any individual who does not have a legitimate reason for being on the campus will be excused from campus.

Montgomery Community College
1011 Page Street
Troy, North Carolina 27371
Telephone: 910-576-6222
Web Site: www.montgomery.edu
Fax: 910-576-2176

Montgomery Community College is an equal opportunity institution.

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mary chesson directory A Message from the Interim President

 

Welcome to Montgomery Community College, a golden opportunity in the heart Montgomery County and the Uwharrie Mountains. Our college mascot – the Montgomery Community College Trailblazer—fits the tenacious spirit of our students. Through our varied programs and educational opportunities, our students are, indeed, blazing trails for their future.

Our programs of study in the areas of business technologies, commercial technologies, health and public services, and college transfer provide many opportunities for our students to cut their own path. We also provide services for those seeking new skills, for those needing English as a second language, for dislocated workers, for industries needing technology training for employees, and for others in need of literacy assistance.

Our faculty and staff have a strong passion for their work and a commitment to education. They are ready to instruct and support students in their educational journey.

We look forward to serving you, our students, whether you are in the classroom or reaching your educational goals through distance learning. The Board of Trustees, faculty, and staff of MCC are committed to providing quality educational instruction, training, and support to help you blaze the trail for your own educational dream. Thank you for giving us the opportunity to serve you.

Mary A. Chesson
Interim President

 


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INDEX

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

A
Academic Advisors
Academic Calendar
Academic Forgiveness Policy
Academic Honors
Academic Load Policy
Academic Probation
Academic Progress/Standing
Academic Suspension and Reinstatement
Accounting Program
Accreditation
Activity Fee
Administration (Directory)
Admissions (Curriculum)
Admissions (Continuing Education)
Adult Basic Skills (see Career and College Readiness)
Adult High School Diploma
Advanced Standing
Advanced Placement for High School Students
Adverse Weather
Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Technology Program
Appeals Process
Articulation Agreements
Assessment
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Arts Elementary Education Pre-Major
Associate in General Education
Associate in Science
Attendance

B
Basic Law Enforcement Training
Board of Trustees
Business and Industry Services
Business Administration Program

C
Campus Food Services
Campus Security Act
Career Information
Career and College Readiness (formerly Adult Basic Skills)
Career Readiness Certification
Catalog of Record
CEUs
Civil Rights (Due Process)
Class/Program Cancellations
College Level Examination Program (CLEP)
College Goals
College Transfer Programs
Compensatory Education
Computer Forensics Certificate
Computer Information Technology Program
Concurrent Enrollment
Continuing Education
Counseling Services
Course Descriptions
Course Repetition Policy (Continuing Education)
Course Repetition Policy (Curriculum)
Course Residency Requirements
Course Substitution Policy
Credit-by-Examination
Criminal Justice Technology Program
Criminal Record Screening
Curriculum Programs of Study
Customized Training

D
Dental Assisting Program
Directory
Distance Learning
Drug Testing

E
Early Childhood Education Program
Educational Policies and Guidelines
Electrical Systems Technology Program
English as a Second Language
Enrollment of High School Students

F
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)
Fees (Continuing Education)
Fees (Curriculum)
Financial Assistance
First Aid
Food Service
Foodservice Technology Program
Foreign Students
Forest Management Technology Program
Foundation Board of Directors
Foundation, MCC
Foundational Studies

G
General Education Development (GED)
GIS Certificate
Goals of the College
Grade Contesting Policy
Grading System
Graduation Requirements
Gunsmithing Program

H
High School Students
History of the College
Honors and Awards
Housing
Human Resource Development
Human Services Technology Program
Human Services Technology: Developmental Disabilities
Hunting & Shooting Sports Management

I
Independent Study
Infant/Toddler Care Certificate
Inmate Education
Insurance, Student

J
Job Referral Services

L
Lab Fees, Curriculum
Library and Information Services

M
Medical Assisting Program
Metal Engraving Program
Mission Statement

N
NRA Courses
Non-Discriminiation Statement

O
Occupational Training
Office Administration Program
Office Administration: Legal Concentration
Orientation

P
Performance Measures
Placement Testing
Practical Nursing Program
President's Message
Professional Crafts: Clay Program
Programs of Study, Curriculum

R
Readmission
Refunds (Continuing Education)
Refunds (Curriculum)
Registration
Religious Observance
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes

S
Satisfactory Academic Progress
School Age Care Certificate
Self Supporting Courses
Small Business Center
Special Credit Students
Social Security Numbers
Standards of Progress
Student Attire
Student Classifications
Student Conduct
Student Information, Access and Release (see FERPA)
Student Rights and Responsibilities
Student Government Association
Student Services
Students with Special Needs

T
Taxidermy Program
Technology Fee
Textbooks and Supplies
Transcripts
Transfer Opportunities
Transfer of Credits
Tuition
Tutorial Services

U
Unofficial Drop by Instructor

V
Veterans
Vision Statement
Visitors

W
Withdrawal from the College

 

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Academic Calendar

History of Montgomery Community College

Vision, Mission and Goals

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ACCREDITATION

Montgomery Community College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award associate degrees, diplomas, and certificates. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Montgomery Community College. The Practical Nursing diploma program is approved by the North Carolina Board of Nursing. Graduates of the Basic Law Enforcement Training certificate program are qualified to take a certification examination mandated by the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and/or the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Education Training Standards Commission. The Medical Assisting program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs upon recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB).(1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756, 727-210-2350). The Dental Assisting program is accredited by the American Dental Association Commission on Dental Accreditation (211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago Illinois 60611.) Graduates are qualified to take the Dental Assisting National Board Exam. The Human Services Technology program is accredited by the Council for Standards in Human Services Education (CSHSE), 3337 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, 571-257-3959.


NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT

MCC has filed an Assurance of Compliance with all requirements imposed by or pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Under the Assurance, MCC is committed not to discriminate against any person on the grounds of race, creed, color, sex, age, handicap, or national origin in the admission policies and practices relating to the treatment of students and other individuals, including the provision of services, financial aid, and other benefits, and including the use of any building, structure, room, space, materials, equipment, facility or other property.

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Performance Measures

 

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FOUNDATION
The Montgomery Community College Foundation, Incorporated is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation established to foster and promote the growth, progress and general welfare of the College; to solicit, acquire, receive, administer and hold property, both real and personal, for the benefit of the College; and to extend financial aid to persons desiring to attend Montgomery Community College. The Foundation is governed by a Board of Directors charged with planning and reviewing the Foundation’s strategic plan and operation, and managing and disbursing the Foundation’s funds. Funds are raised through private solicitations and planned, annual events such as the Fund Drive, Golf Tournament and Raffle.


LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES
The mission of the Montgomery Community College Library is to provide access to information in a variety of formats and to serve as an integral part of the College’s teaching, learning, research, and service to traditional and distance learning students, faculty, staff, and community in direct support of the mission of the College. To accomplish this mission, the Library continually works to:
• build, with the collaboration of faculty, a collection of resources appropriate to the curriculum and to the current and future needs of the College community;
• use current technologies to provide a system of organization and physical access to the collection of the library and to sources beyond the collection;
• design and deliver instruction and consultation about the organization, content, and use of learning resources that includes instruction that is user-based, on demand, and customizable;
• provide a functional, accessible, attractive, user-centered physical facility to support and increase the use of learning and information resources;
The MCC Library has a carefully selected and growing collection of more than 24,000 volumes, subscriptions to current periodicals, and a variety of non-print information sources. Library patrons have access to a variety of online resources including NC LIVE, a collection of online databases that provides access to newspapers, magazines, journals, and a variety of reference sources, many with full text.
Patrons are encouraged to use the library for study, research, self-improvement, and browsing. Professional staff members are on duty to assist with reference, research, and reading guidance. The staff provides assistance and orientation in the use of the library and its resources. The library is located in Building 200.


DISTANCE LEARNING
Distance learning is an education delivery strategy in which all, or a majority of, instruction occurs when the student and instructor are not in the same place at the same time. This approach may include computer technologies, video or audio feeds. Distance Learning at Montgomery Community College utilizes courses wholly or partly delivered via the internet and video teleconferencing using the North Carolina Information Highway (NCIH).
The mission of Distance Learning at MCC is to provide accessibility to educational options which are not bound by time or place. To accomplish this mission, Distance Learning continually works to:
• provide options for students who may not be able to come to campus regularly because of physical limitations, work and family commitments, or by preference;
• enable students who prefer to learn through nontraditional delivery to have access to educational content in different, yet comparable, formats;
• have distance learning parallel and supplement traditional course offerings and include comparable course outcomes.


STUDENT SERVICES

The mission of Student Services is to provide high quality educational support services to all students. Student Services professionals work in partnership with faculty and other college personnel to help ensure that student success in a broad sense is possible through strategies that develop knowledge, skills, good attitudes, self-determination and the ability to control one’s environment.
Student Services activities include: admissions, assessment, counseling (academic, career and personal), registration and records, financial aid, veterans assistance, job referral, transfer student assistance, recruiting and coordination of student activities.

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Continuing Education

PURPOSE
Education is a process that continues throughout an individual’s life. The recent rapid developments in technology have made it imperative that individuals make purposeful plans in order to keep abreast of these developments. It is the College’s aim to afford individuals the opportunity to develop to their fullest potential in whatever areas of vocational and cultural endeavor that they desire. The Continuing Education Division plays a vital role in providing those opportunities. Through a variety of programs and services, the Division provides opportunities for initial workforce development, occupational training and retraining, basic skills development, and academic and personal enrichment.


ADMISSION

Any adult who has reached the age of eighteen (18) and is not enrolled in public school is eligible to enroll in Adult Continuing Education classes. Persons between 16 and 18 years of age who have special needs may be considered for admission with the approval of the local school principal and/or parent, legal guardian or other person or agency having legal custody and control. Persons enrolled in public school are not eligible to take Literacy classes, with the exception of English as a Second Language (ESL). In addition, MCC permits the enrollment of undocumented nonimmigrant applicants in approved continuing education programs.


FEES

A small fee is charged for continuing education classes. Such fees, when charged, are due and payable upon entry to class. Books and supplies are available through the College bookstore.
REGISTRATION FEES
Registration fees, set by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges and the North Carolina General Assembly, are subject to change. Registration fees are based on the course length or total contact hours of the class or program. Registration Fees for Continuing Education are as follows:
NEW FEES EFFECTIVE AUGUST 15, 2013:
1-24 contact hours........................................$70
25-50 contact hours....................................$125
51-100+ contact hours................................$180

ADDITIONAL CONTINUING EDUCATION FEES
Bricklaying.................................................................................................$ 20.00
Digital Photography........................................................................................ 5.00
Insurance (Nursing Assisting, Phlebotomy, EMS Classes)
A. Liability..................................................................................................... 11.00
B. Accident.................................................................................................... 1.60
NRA Classes (occupational; MIG and TIG welding for NRA classes)........  60.00
Technology Fee (computer, computer repair and upgrade classes)............  5.00
Welding Classes (MIG, TIG, & Stick)............................................................  20.00
Additional fees collected at registration shall only be refunded in the event of 100% withdrawal by the student prior to the beginning of the respective class. Additional fees are non-refundable under any other circumstances unless students withdraw from college prior to the first day of classes.


REGISTRATION FEE REFUNDS

A student who officially withdraws from an Occupational Extension class prior to the first class meeting is eligible for a 100 percent refund upon request to the Continuing Education Division. After the respective class begins, a 75 percent refund may be granted upon request if the student officially withdraws from class prior to or on the 10 percent point of the scheduled hours of the class. In the case of contact hour classes, a student is eligible for a 100 percent refund if the student officially withdraws from class prior to the first class meeting. After the class has begun, a student may receive a 75 percent refund if he or she officially withdraws on or before 10 calendar days from the first day of class. Students are eligible for a 100 percent refund if the class is canceled by the College. No registration fee refunds are permitted for self-supporting classes except in the case of class cancellation by the College or under extenuating circumstances requiring approval from the College President.

CERTIFICATES
Certificates may be awarded to students meeting requirements for selected Continuing Education classes/programs.

CLASS LOCATIONS & DELIVERY
A number of classes are held on the College campus. Classes are also conducted in the community and in businesses of the Montgomery Community College service area whenever there is sufficient demand. Instruction for Continuing Education classes, workshops, and seminars places emphasis on the adult learners’ needs. We understand that some persons may be coming back to improve themselves after being away from a classroom for a number of years and that others are continuous learners wanting instruction to be focused, enjoyable, and respectful of their busy personal and job schedules. To better meet the needs of all adult learners, we offer a variety of instructional delivery options. Commonly, instruction is provided through the traditional classroom with an instructor. Other options include programs delivered through the Internet, video conference and combination of traditional classroom and self-directed computer-assisted instruction.

CLASS FORMATION
Continuing Education classes are often established on a demand basis. Different program areas have different requirements for the number of students, cost, and location. Course offerings reflect the needs and interests of the citizens. This means that MCC counts on the public to request courses. If you desire a course which has not been announced, contact the Continuing Education Division of MCC. Your cooperation in recruiting a group of your friends and neighbors for a course is very much appreciated.


COURSE REPETITION POLICY

Occupational Training Programs. Courses of an essential nature would likely require certification of a state, county, or federal agency. Repetition would be in order until the student has reached a level of proficiency required by law, policy, or other regulating criteria. Students may repeat occupational courses once at the regular registration fee in a five-year period. Registration fees for additional repeats will be assessed for the full amount of the per student cost for the class.
Community Service/Self Supporting. Repetition is not a factor in these courses. Although titled and coded in accordance with the North Carolina Administrative Code and the North Carolina Community College System Extension Class Code from semester to semester in the same manner, the content changes. Adult students have input into what, how, and when these courses are taught. It is usual, reasonable, and customary to find significant differences from class to class because of student demands, differences, and interests. Course outlines rather than course title or code will determine course content. Students may repeatedly enroll in these courses so long as they feel they are benefiting from the course.
Career and College Readiness (formerly Adult Basic Skills). As long as a student is showing measurable progress (as indicated by nationally standardized tests and/or instructor-made tests) from year to year, that student may repeat as often as necessary until educational goals are achieved.
Human Resource Development (HRD). A student may enroll in HRD classes as often as is desired or until personal employment goals are met.
Business and Industry Services (BIS). Because of the customized nature of training offered under Business and Industry Services, class size and repetition are determined with the best interests of the business and industry and the college as the factors.

DISTANCE LEARNING
Distance learning allows students to complete training without time and place restrictions. Students are not required to attend classes in a specific location at a specific time. Information and technology provide linkages between the student and instructor. The learning is self-paced to match the learning style of the student, and the student may take occupational or self-supporting programs via the Internet. Most importantly, this approach to learning allows the student to obtain the desired training at a time convenient to them.

ENROLLMENT
Students must pre-register for classes by completing the Continuing Education registration form and submitting the appropriate fee by the scheduled deadlines as advertised.


CONTINUING EDUCATION UNIT (CEU)

A Continuing Education Unit (CEU) is a unit designation recognized by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and is awarded for select Continuing Education classes at MCC. The CEU signifies the class is organized for a quality instructional program. CEUs are earned at a rate of one (1) CEU for each ten (10) hours of class.

AREAS OF STUDY IN CONTINUING EDUCATION
Areas of study in Continuing Education include the following:

  • Occupational Training
  • Self-Supporting
  • Business and Industry Services
  • Career and College Readiness (formerly Adult Basic Skills)
  • English as a Second Language (ESL)


OCCUPATIONAL TRAINING COURSES


Occupational training is accomplished via cooperation with industry, professional groups, and other interested groups as well as through research of local and regional career opportunities in providing varied programs for the expressed purpose of updating and upgrading skills whereby the working person might enjoy a more satisfying and financially rewarding occupation. These classes may be held at any appropriate meeting place whether it be in industrial firms, public school buildings, libraries, or at the College.

Allied Health and Emergency Services
When medical or emergency services are necessary, having the best trained individuals caring for you is very important. Continuing Education offers several programs in allied health and emergency services. All programs are designed to meet local, state and other guidelines relative to requirements for certification purposes. Program areas are:

  • CPR/First Aid
  • Emergency Medical Technician
  • Fire and Rescue Service
  • Nursing Assistant I and II
  • Phlebotomy Technician
  • Emergency Medical Dispatcher

Certification and License Renewal
Certification and license renewal courses are offered periodically in a variety of areas. The issuing agency determines the frequency of renewal and the number of hours required. Courses for renewal are:

  • Correctional Officers
  • Law Enforcement
  • Real Estate
  • Fire Fighters
  • CPR/First Aid
  • Teacher Renewal
  • Funeral Directors

Career Readiness Certificate (CRC)
The North Carolina Career Readiness Certification (CRC) is an assessment-based credential that gives employers and career seekers a uniform measure of key workplace skills. The Certificate is based on established WorkKeys® assessment tests. To earn a CRC individuals undergo testing related to reading, applied math, and locating information through the WorkKeys® skills assessment system.

Human Resources Development (HRD)
The Human Resources Development (HRD) program is pre-vocational, pre-employment, and placement training. It is designed to assist the chronically unemployed in finding employment and the underemployed in finding better employment.
The program provides structured pre-vocational training, counseling, and assistance into permanent employment or further education/training. The pre-vocational component provides students with instruction in basic communication skills and a basic orientation to the world of work. Students are taught positive self-concept. Other topics within the pre-vocational component are planning and reaching goals and making the transition to the workforce.
Achievement of a North Carolina Career Readiness Certificate is a major goal of HRD classes. Course objectives will incorporate preparation for successful completion of testing related to reading, applied math, and locating information through the WorkKeys® skills assessment system.
The students are encouraged to visit the JobLink Career Center, located in the Student Services Division. The HRD Program and the JobLink Career Center are in cooperative effort to offer counseling sessions and job referral services.

Industrial Maintenance
A number of short courses are available for entry and upgrade of industrial maintenance skills. The courses areas include hydraulics, pneumatics, PLC programming, electronic control circuits, welding, electrical safety, mechanical power transmissions, DC controls, bearings, electrical code, AC/DC electronics, gears and gear trains, control wiring, load wiring, lockout/tagout, and confined space entry.

Law Enforcement Training
Staff development and ongoing in-service training is a necessity for law enforcement today. Legal updates, firearms recertification, S.W.A.T., and search and seizure are just some of the types of training available to law enforcement agencies. All training is designed to meet the needs of state, county, city, and other law enforcement agencies. Annual recertification classes are conducted for law enforcement and correctional officers.

SELF-SUPPORTING COURSES

Short, personal enrichment courses are the mainstay of Self Supporting courses. Courses are offered in many locations throughout Montgomery County. Courses may be offered day, evening or weekend. Fees are determined by the cost of the course. There are no fee exemptions allowed for self supporting courses.


NRA Short-Term Gunsmithing and Law Enforcement Armorer School
Short-term courses are designed for individuals interested in learning new techniques or perfecting traditional techniques in the specified fields of study. Courses are offered on a self-supporting basis allowing no fee exemptions. Fees charged do not include any tools or supplies. NRA Short-Term classes schedule changes every year and the new schedule is listed on our website in January.

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY SERVICES

A variety of training programs and services are available to area businesses and industries, governmental agencies, and public service organizations. These programs are customized to meet individual company needs. With the assistance of appropriated state tax dollars, these training programs are usually well within the budgets of our local firms. Call the College for more information on business and industry programs. We will be happy to assist your efforts to develop and train your employees by working side by side with you and your staff. Our overall scope of services includes:
assessment of employee skills to determine need for training;

  • job analysis and work procedure writing;
  • employee development planning;
  • training plan development;
  • training program and course design;
  • training delivery to employees (to include office, plant production, maintenance,
  • process management, and man
  • agement at all levels);
  • trainer training;
  • training documentation; and
  • training evaluation to include employee competency and program cost.

Small Business Center
The objective of the Small Business Center is to increase the success rate and the number of viable small businesses in Montgomery County by providing high quality, readily accessible assistance to prospective and existing small business owners and their employees. Montgomery Community College’s Small Business Center is a community-based provider of education and training, counseling, information, and referral.

Customized Training
The Customized Training courses support the economic development efforts of the state by providing education and training opportunities for eligible businesses and industries. Amended in 2008, these courses integrate New and Expanding Industry Training and Customized Industry Training to more effectively respond to business and industry (G.S. 115D-5.1e). The Customized Training courses also include the former Focused Industry Training and shall offer classes and training services to assist new and existing business and industry to remain productive, profitable, and within the state. The courses were developed in recognition of the fact that one of the most important factors for a business or industry considering locating, expanding, or remaining in North Carolina is the ability of the state to ensure the presence of a well-trained workforce. The courses are designed to react quickly to the needs of businesses and to respect the confidential nature of proprietary processes and information within those businesses.

CAREER AND COLLEGE READINESS (FORMERLY ADULT BASIC SKILLS) COURSES

For the adult who was unable to complete public school, a series of basic courses are offered county-wide. These courses are free of charge to adults. Courses start at grade one and end with the high school equivalency certificate/General Education Development (GED).

Adult Basic Education (ABE) and General Education Development (GED)
MCC offers combined Adult Basic Education (ABE) and General Education Development (GED) classes. These classes are designed for adults with or without high school diplomas to improve reading, writing and math skills and to prepare them for the GED exam. Before enrolling in a class, an individual must attend a Basic Skills Registration Session. Minors (16-17 years of age) may enroll in the program but must obtain a Minors Release Form. This form must be completed by a parent or legal guardian and the Board of Education before registering. Classes are offered both day and evening in communities throughout the county and on the College campus. There is no cost for the ABE/GED classes, but there is a one time testing fee payable before taking the actual GED test. MCC will assist interested organizations and groups of individuals in establishing new ABE/GED classes.
General Educational Development (GED) tests are designed to measure the important knowledge and skills usually learned during high school but that one may have obtained through experience, reading, and informal training.
Successfully passing the five sections of the GED test allows the student to receive a high school equivalency certificate issued by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges. The tests are designed to measure a person’s knowledge and skill in the following:

  • Correct and effective English in written expression
  • (An essay on an assigned topic is required.)
  • Effective reading, understanding, and interpretation of Social Studies
  • Effective reading, understanding, and interpretation of Natural Science
  • Effective reading, understanding, and interpretation of Literature
  • Ability to solve problems in Mathematics

    Each section requires from one to two hours. A student may select an area in which to work, successfully pass the test and move to the next area. There is no set procedure. A total score of at least 2250 points with no single test score below 410 is passing.
    The certificate is issued by the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges. It is the legal equivalent to a high school diploma and is recognized almost without exception by industry, agencies of the government, colleges, and other organizations and institutions.

Adult High School Diploma Program (AHS)
MCC also offers the Adult High School Diploma through an agreement with the Montgomery County Public School System. Students are provided academic courses to complete graduation requirements. Before enrolling, prospective students must have been out of school for at least six months, attend an orientation session, and obtain an official transcript from the last high school attended. Minors (16-17 years of age) must first obtain a Minor Release Form at MCC. A parent or legal guardian and the Board of Education must complete this release form. Day and evening classes are offered both in classroom and laboratory settings on the MCC campus. This flexibility enables students to work at their own pace and at times most convenient for them. The North Carolina Competency Test provided by the North Carolina Department of Instruction is offered to Adult High School students on the MCC campus at scheduled dates throughout the year.

Compensatory Education (CED)
Montgomery Community College offers Compensatory Education (CED) classes. These classes are designed to help mentally and emotionally challenged adults to become independent and to acquire skills needed for participation in our society.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL)

English as a Second Language (ESL) provides non-English speaking students the opportunity to learn the English language. Classes are centered around the objectives of developing language competency and cultural orientation. Any non-English speaking adult or any adult who wants to improve his/her English is eligible to enroll. Classes are offered both day and evening in communities throughout the county and on the College campus. There is no cost for the ESL classes. Montgomery Community College will assist any businesses interested in offering ESL classes for their employees.

Ingles comos segundo lenguaje (ESL)
Para más información acerca de las clases de Ingles, por favor refierace al horario de clases en el folleto que recibe por correo dos veces por año.

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Curriculum Information and Policies

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ADMISSION
Montgomery Community College (MCC) operates under an open-door admissions policy as established by the North Carolina Community College System. This means that any person, whether a high school graduate or nongraduate, who is 18 years old or older and who is able to benefit from further formal education will be served by the institution. Individuals under 18 years of age may be admitted if they are already a high school graduate or if they possess a GED or high school equivalent. High school students may be admitted to curriculum courses under within parameters established by the State of North Carolina. MCC reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant who has been suspended or expelled from another education institution. The College also reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant whose enrollment or continued presence is considered a risk for campus safety or disruption of the educational process.

Admission to the College does not imply immediate admission to the curriculum desired by the applicant. Admission to a specific program of study is based on guidelines developed to ensure the student’s chances of success in the program. Any restrictions on admission to specific programs are flexible enough to allow students opportunities for admission when they demonstrate aptitude for these programs as determined by personal interest, academic background, placement tests, and/or personal interviews. If an academic deficiency exists, applicants will be given an opportunity to remove the deficiency by taking preparatory work.


GENERAL ADMISSION PROCEDURES
Students are admitted to MCC without regard to race, sex, color, creed, age, handicap, religion or national origin. Applicants for admission into curriculum programs should complete the following general admission procedures:

1. Complete and return the admission application to Student Services.
2. Submit an official high school or General Educational Development (GED) transcript and official transcripts from all colleges attended. An official transcript is one mailed directly from the high school, college or other institution to the Admissions Office at MCC. It is the applicant’s responsibility to request that transcripts be sent.
3. Take any required assessment inventories when notified by the Admissions Office.
4. Complete any additional requirements for specific curricula.

Address correspondence concerning admission to curriculum programs to:
Admissions Office
Montgomery Community College
1011 Page Street
Troy, NC 27371
Phone: 910-576-6222, Ext. 240
E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

All admission procedures should be completed at least four weeks prior to enrollment into a program. However, some curriculum programs at MCC have limited enrollment and prospective students are advised to apply early. When an enrollment quota for a class/program has been filled or the class/program has a specific prerequisite requirement, the applicant will be placed on an alternate or waiting list and notified by the Admissions Office. When all information is received, the academic record will be assessed and the applicant will be notified concerning acceptance and enrollment procedures. An applicant applying fewer than four weeks prior to enrollment may be notified to follow admission procedures as a walk-in student during open registration.


ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
A high school diploma or the equivalent is required of all applicants for degree programs. The GED or Adult High School (AHS) diploma is acceptable. GED scores must meet North Carolina standards with a total score of 2250, with no single test score below 410. Associate degree programs require an applicant to complete assessment inventories in numerical skills, algebra skills, writing skills, and reading skills.


STAND-ALONE DIPLOMA & CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
A high school diploma, GED, or Adult High School diploma is preferred for entrance into a stand-alone diploma or certificate program. However, consideration is given to any applicant whose interest and ability make successful completion of a diploma or certificate program likely. Applicants without a high school diploma or GED may be required to demonstrate an ability to benefit by successfully completing an assessment inventory (ASSET or COMPASS). Some diploma and certificate programs may require an applicant to complete assessment inventories in reading, writing, and numerical skills after acceptance.

READMISSION
Former students who left Montgomery Community College in good standing are encouraged to reenroll for further study. Students who have been out one term or longer should contact the Admissions Office to have their academic file reactivated. If a conference with a counselor or academic advisor is required, the student will be notified. Coursework previously taken at MCC will be evaluated for credit according to merit and relevance. Students being readmitted are required to satisfy requirements for graduation according to the current approved standards for their particular curriculum.

Certain courses in allied health programs must be completed within a specific time frame. The age of those courses can affect the readmission process. More specific information about readmission requirements for allied health programs may be obtained from the MCC Admissions Office.

Former students desiring to reenter from academic suspension must do so through the Student Services Counselor. Former students who were withdrawn for disciplinary reasons must have approval from the Vice President of Student Services to reenroll.


SPECIFIC ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

ALLIED HEALTH PROGRAMS
A high school diploma, GED that meets North Carolina standards (as stated before), or Adult High School Diploma is required of all applicants for all allied health programs. Applicants must demonstrate the potential for academic achievement as evidenced by successful completion of assessment inventories. Upon initial inquiry, prospective applicants will be given the minimum score recommendations in the areas of writing skills, reading skills, algebra skills, and numerical skills. Once Practical Nursing students have met all general admission requirements, they will become eligible to take the Test for Essential Academic Skills {TEAS} which is the primary admission test for the Practical Nursing program. Those applicants selected for admission must attend information sessions conducted by college personnel. Students not meeting admissions criteria will be advised regarding removal of deficiencies.
All applicants selected for admission into an allied health program must meet physical and emotional health requirements necessary to provide safe health care. An Applicant Medical Form will be provided by the Admissions Office. Applicants must submit to the Admissions Office the completed form which includes the results of a physical examination performed by a licensed physician. The Applicant Medical Form must be reviewed for satisfactory results prior to final acceptance as a regular curriculum student. Additional information concerning admission to allied health programs is available in Student Services.

BASIC LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING (BLET)
In addition to MCC’s general admission requirements, the following apply to the Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) Program. A BLET applicant must be a U.S. citizen and at least 20 years old. Additionally, a high school diploma, GED, or Adult High School Diploma is required for admission into the program. High school diplomas earned through correspondence enrollment are not recognized toward the educational requirements. Applicants must submit a completed Medical History Statement (Forms F-1 and F-2) which include results of a physical examination conducted by a licensed physician to the MCC Criminal Justice Department prior to registration. Medical history forms are available from the Admissions Office. In addition, BLET applicants must have a criminal history report for all locations in which they have resided since the age of 18. The report(s) must be approved by the BLET school director prior to enrolling in the program. Applicants are required to take a reading skills assessment inventory, must possess a valid driver’s license, and must be sponsored or employed by a public law enforcement agency prior to enrollment and maintain that sponsorship/employment throughout the course.

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT AT MULTIPLE COMMUNITY COLLEGES
Students may enroll in more than one community college at the same time. The first college that the student registers with and where they are pursuing their degree is the home college. Additional colleges in which the student enrolls simultaneously are the receiving colleges.

Students will not be charged additional tuition at the receiving college when registered for 16 or more credit hours at the home college when the following condition is met. The student must present a letter from the home college that includes (1) verification of credit hours registered for at the home college; (2) verification of tuition status at the home college; and (3) a list of specific courses that the student is approved to register for at the receiving college to include any telecourses, independent study courses, and non-traditional delivery courses (i.e. Internet, Information Highway, etc.)

Additionally, if the total credit hours at both colleges exceed 22 credit hours, the student’s advisor at the home college must stipulate approval for the student to take any hours beyond 22 credit hours. When the student is registered for less than 16 credit hours at the home college, the above conditions must be met and the student must pay tuition charges for up to 16 total credit hours at the receiving college. Tuition charges are in accordance with the rate set by the North Carolina Community College System and the General Assembly. Note: Additional steps may be required for admission into specific classes. Consult with the Admissions Office for more information.

FOREIGN STUDENTS
MCC is not approved to enroll non-immigrant students with F, J, or M visas. Students with other visas will be reviewed on an individual basis.

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
The Career & College Promise (CCP) program provides seamless dual enrollment educational opportunities for eligible North Carolina high school students in order to accelerate completion of college certificates, diplomas, and associate degrees that lead to college transfer or provide entry-level job skills. MCC offers all four Core 44 College Transfer pathways and a variety of Career Technical Education pathways.

Core 44 College Transfer Pathways. The College Transfer pathways allows high school juniors and seniors the opportunity to complete some of the core general education courses typically required during the first two years of a four-year degree. To be accepted into a Core 44 College Transfer Pathway, a student must (1) be a North Carolina high school junior or senior; (2) have a weighted GPA of 3.0 on high school courses; (3) demonstrate college readiness on assessment/placement tests by meeting or exceeding specific test scores in English, reading, and math; and (4) meet all program prerequisites.

A high school junior or senior who does not demonstrate college readiness on the assessment/placement tests may be provisionally enrolled in a College Transfer pathway if the following conditions are met. To qualify for provisional acceptance status, a student must (1) have a cumulative weighted GPA of at least 3.5 on high school courses; (2) have completed two years of high school English with a grade of "C" or higher; (3) have completed high school Algebra II (or a higher level math) with a grade of "C" or higher; (4) obtain the written approval of the high school principal or designess; and (5) obtain the written approval of the community college president or designee. A provisional status student may register only for college mathematics (MAT) and college English (ENG) courses within the chosen pathway. To be eligible to register for other courses in the pathway, the student must first successfully complete mathematics and English courses with grades of "C" or higher.

Career Technical Education Pathways. The Career Technical Education pathways allows juniors and seniors the opportunity to enroll in MCC certificate programs related to high school career clusters. To be accepted into a Career Technical Education pathway, a student must (1) be a North Carolina high school junior or senior; (2) have a weighted GPA of 3.0 on high school courses or have the approval of the high school principal or designee; and (3) meet all program prerequisites.

To maintain eligibility for continued enrollment in any CCP pathway, the student must (1) continue to make progress toward high school graduation and (2) maintain at least a 2.0 GPA in college coursework after completing two courses.

HOME-SCHOOL STUDENTS
Home-school students must provide (1) proof of registration with the North Carolina Department of Non-Public Education and (2) an official home-school transcript including annual results received on nationally standardized tests. If these criteria cannot be met, home-school students may pursue their GED or Adult High School diploma.

SPECIAL CREDIT STUDENTS
Admission as a Special Credit Student requires completion of an MCC Application for Admission and the satisfaction of any necessary prerequisite course requirements. Special credit students may not displace a returning regular curriculum student in a class required for his/her degree.

STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL NEEDS
MCC seeks to comply fully with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. The College is fully committed to making programs, courses, and services available to all citizens as well as maintaining confidentiality regarding all information and services provided. If students have a special need that may affect academic performance and seek accommodations, it is their responsibility to inform the Director of Counseling Services as soon as possible.

It is important to request accommodations in a timely manner (at least one month prior to registration) in order that the request may be considered and approved by the Vice President of Student Services.

To determine the eligibility for services, documentation of disability may be required of all students requesting academic adjustments or auxiliary aids. Documentation may include results of medical, psychological, or emotional diagnostic tests, or other professional evaluations for verification of the need for adjustments or aids. MCC will, where possible, seek assistance from outside agencies (i.e., Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, and other organizations).

Appropriate testing accommodations are available upon request for students with special needs. Students with learning disabilities must provide documentation and have the documentation evaluated before requests for accommodations will be granted. Applications to request psychological, medical and other related professional evaluations may be obtained from the Director of Counseling Services or the Admissions Officer.

UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS
Based on policies and procedures outlined in the North Carolina Administrative Code (23 NCAC 02C .0301), MCC allows the admission of students who do not have the necessary documentation to prove United States citizenship under the following conditions:

1. The student must be a graduate of a U.S. public high school, private high school, or home school that operates in compliance with state or local law. A GED is not acceptable.
2. The student will be classified as an out-of-state resident and must pay out-of-state tuition.
3. The student may not displace a North Carolina or U.S. citizen.

STUDENT CLASSIFICATIONS

Audit Student: a student registered for a course for which he/she does not wish to receive credit. The audit student is not required to take examinations; otherwise, participation and attendance in class is the same as that of a credit student. The fee for auditing a class is the same as the fee for credit. Certain curricula, because of special requirements, have no courses open for audit. A student has until mid-term to change a registration to audit with the Registrar.
Concurrently Enrolled Student: a student who is enrolled in more than one community college at the same time. The first college that the student registers with and where they are pursuing their degree is the home college. Additional colleges in which the student enrolls simultaneously are the receiving colleges.
Freshman: a student who has earned fewer than 32 semester hours of credit.
Full-time Student: a student who is registered for 12 or more semester hours credit.
Part-time Student: a student who is registered for 11 or less semester hours credit.
Probation Student: a student who fails to meet the minimum academic requirements set forth by the College. Any student on probation must earn the sufficient GPA set forth in the College Catalog to avoid academic suspension. The student is required to consult with a counselor and may be required to take a reduced academic load or additional preparation.
Provisional Students (Deferred Acceptance Status): may be enrolled as a full- or part-time student yet are unable to complete pre-admission or assessment requirements before the registration period. When the student has fulfilled all requirements, he/she will be enrolled in good standing. The student must fulfill all requirements by the end of his/her first term or he/she may not be allowed to re-enroll. Special considerations for extenuating circumstances beyond the end of the first term requirements may be waived by the Vice President of Student Services.
Regular Curriculum Student: a curriculum student enrolled or accepted for enrollment for the purpose of obtaining a degree, diploma, or certificate at a rate of pursuit to ensure timely graduation.
Sophomore: a student who has earned 32 or more semester hours credit.
Special Credit Student: a student who registers for credit courses to meet an individual educational need, but who has not expressed the intent to complete a given curriculum. If a Special Credit student decides to complete a given curriculum, he/she must submit a Change of Information Request and meet regular admission and assessment requirements. Special Credit Students are not eligible for financial assistance or veteran educational benefits.
Students with Special Needs: students enrolled through the provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and/or the Americans with Disabilities Act.


ASSESSMENT (PLACEMENT) INVENTORIES
The American College Testing (ACT) Service’s COMPASS assessment inventory is given to students in associate degree programs to determine academic readiness. Students should complete the assessment inventory prior to registration for proper advising and placement. Information about score requirements is available in the Student Services Division. After testing, each student will receive a copy of his/her COMPASS Student Advising Report listing scores obtained and course recommendations based on these scores.

All associate degree students will be assessed in writing, reading, numerical and algebra skills. Stand-alone diploma and certificate students may be assessed in reading and numerical skills. BLET students are required to take the reading and writing assessment only. Special credit students are assessed only when necessary to satisfy a prerequisite course requirement. Students with special needs should contact the Counselor prior to scheduling their placement test to ensure that appropriate accommodations will be provided. All information and services provided for special needs and disabled students is confidential.

Students needing additional educational preparation will be advised regarding removal of deficiencies. For students enrolled in associate degree programs, deficiencies in writing, reading, numerical skills, or algebra must be removed prior to taking any course work in English composition or mathematics respectively. Students may use a calculator for the elementary and intermediate algebra portions of the assessment test. For students who do not bring calculators to the testing session, one will be provided for them. Students may retest on COMPASS based upon recommendation of the testing coordinator. A student may test twice at MCC.

Students meeting the following criteria may be exempt from taking specified sections of COMPASS:
• Students with a score of 500 or above on the critical reading portion of the SAT may be exempt from the Writing and Reading Skills sections.
• Students with a score of 520 or above on the math portion of the SAT may be exempt from Numerical Skills, Elementary Algebra, and Intermediate Algebra.
• Students who have taken the ACT will be advised on the appropriate sections to take.
• Students who have taken Accuplacer may transfer their scores to MCC and will be advised on the appropriate sections to take.
• Students who have taken English composition, reading, or math courses at another college or university and received a grade of C or better may not be required to take the related assessment inventories. The courses taken at the other institution must be determined to be equivalent to the entry level courses at Montgomery Community College.
• Students with a score of 3 or higher on the CEEB Advanced Placement English exam may be exempt from the Writing and Reading Skills sections.


CURRICULUM EXPENSES


TUITION, FEE, & TEXTBOOK COSTS
Fees are set by the MCC Board of Trustees in accordance with state laws outlined in the North Carolina Administrative Code. Fees are approved and published annually.

1. All campus students will be assessed the required student activity fee, insurance fees, technology fees, and relevant class and/or lab fees.
2. Fees for incarcerated students are waived as stipulated by law.
3. High school students enrolled in the Career & College Promise (CCP) program are exempt from paying tuition, activity fees, accident insurance fees, and relevant program/course fees. Students may be required to pay any special liability insurance fee required from an off-campus clinical. The local board of education may pay or assist with the cost of textbooks and fees. In the event textbooks are not provided, it is the student’s responsibility to purchase their own textbook and supplies for their class.

ACTIVITY FEE
All curriculum students are required to pay a $38 activity fee each year. The charges per term are as follows: Fall – $15; Spring – $15; Summer – $8. This activity fee is budgeted by the Student Ambassadors and the Student Government Association. The fee is used for special activities and other student-oriented activities and events.

CLASS/LAB FEES

GSM 111 Gunsmithing I.............................................................................................$50
GSM 120 Gunsmithing Tools.....................................................................................100
GSM 225 Gunmetal Refinishing..................................................................................40
MED 140 Exam Room Procedures I........................................................................... .15
MED 150 Lab Procedures I..........................................................................................15
PCC 110 Introduction to Pottery...................................................................................36
PCC 111 Functional Pottery I.......................................................................................36
PCC 130 Pottery Production........................................................................................36
PCC 210 Functional Pottery II.....................................................................................36
PCC 211 Decorative Pottery........................................................................................36
TXY 101 Fish Taxidermy.............................................................................................50
TXY 103 Mammal Taxidermy.....................................................................................50


GRADUATION FEE
Students are expected to pay the graduation fee by April 1. Graduation fees are subject to change at the discretion of the College depending upon increased prices from our supplier.

High School Completion: GED & Adult High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30
Curriculum Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Each additional curriculum degree, diploma or certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5

INSURANCE FEE
Accident Insurance – mandatory for all curriculum students per term............  $1.60
Liability Insurance – per academic year

Mandatory for Dental Assisting students..............................................................$11
Mandatory for Medical Assisting students.............................................................11
Mandatory for Practical Nursing students..............................................................11

Insurance rates are subject to change depending on price quotes from our suppliers. Other insurance options are available. More information is available in Student Services.

PARKING FEE - mandatory for all students per term .................................................$5

PRACTICAL NURSING TESTING FEE
TEAS testing for Practical Nursing program admission.............................................$40

TECHNOLOGY FEE
Mandatory for all curriculum students per term.........................................................$16

TEXTBOOKS & SUPPLIES
Textbooks and supplies are available through the college's virtual bookstore or through the campus store located in Building 100. Depending on the program of study, students can expect to pay between $500 and $700 for textbooks per term. Some programs require the student to purchase uniforms, tools, and/or supplies in addition to textbooks. These additional costs vary according to the program in which the student is enrolled. A list of required/needed items with approximate costs can be provided by the department of interest. Purchase is directly related to the College’s Policy of Ownership.

Policy of Ownership: All projects produced by the student with institutional supplies, materials, tools, and equipment are the property of the College. However, students have the option of purchasing their own supplies, materials, and tools. The projects produced are then the personal property of the student, and the College will charge only for the institutional consumables used by the student in producing the project.

TUITION
Registration and tuition costs are set in accordance with state laws outlined in the North Carolina Administrative Code and are published annually. Registration and tuition costs are subject to change when mandated by the State.
Tuition for full-time in-state students carrying 16 or more semester hours credit is $1152 ($72 per credit hour.) Tuition for full-time out-of-state students carrying 16 or more semester hours credit is $4224 ($264 per credit hour.)

Effective fall 2013, the waiver for students over 65 years of age has been eliminated.

Community college students desiring to enroll in two or more colleges without paying additional tuition must provide a letter from the home college stating enrollment and tuition status as outlined in the Concurrent Enrollment Policy.


TUITION CLASSIFICATION (RESIDENCY)
A legal resident of North Carolina is one who has established residence in this state. Students should know their residence status for tuition payment and understand the regulations governing residence status.
General Statute 16-143.1 (b) passed by the 1973 General Assembly of North Carolina states:
To qualify for in-state tuition, a legal resident must have maintained his/her domicile in North Carolina for at least the 12 months immediately prior to his/her classification as a resident for tuition purposes. In order to be eligible for such classification, the individual must establish that his/her presence in the state during such twelve month period was for purposes of maintaining a bona fide domicile rather than for purposes of mere temporary residence incident to enrollment in an institution of higher education; further (1) if the parents (or court appointed legal guardian) of the individual seeking resident classification are (is) bona fide domiciliaries of this state, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of domiciliary status of the individual applicant and (2) if such parents or guardian are not bona fide domiciliaries of this state, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of non-domiciliary status of the individual.
Living in North Carolina for one year does not guarantee that resident status has been met. The student must satisfy requirements set forth by the General Assembly of North Carolina and the State Residence Committee. In addition, students must provide a preponderance of evidence to support classification as a resident. A copy of these policies and procedures is available for review in Student Services.

REFUNDS
Tuition Refunds. If a student withdraws or drops a class(es), tuition refunds may be granted. Requests for tuition refunds must be made to Student Services.

1. A tuition refund shall be made only under the following circumstances:
a. A 100% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws prior to the first day of class(es) of the academic term as noted in the college calendar. Also, a student is eligible for a 100% refund if the class in which the student is officially registered fails to materialize due to insufficient enrollment.
b. A 75% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from the class(es) prior to or on the official 10% point of the term.
c. For classes beginning at times other than the first week (seven calendar days) of the term, a 100% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from the class prior to the first class meeting. A 75% refund shall be made if the student officially withdraws from the class prior to or on the 10% point of the class.
d. For contact hour classes, apply as (c) above except use 6 calendar days from the first day of the classes as the determination date.
e. In addition, beginning with the first day of classes, students wishing to drop and add classes must do so at the same time or incur a 25% penalty.
2. To comply with applicable federal regulations regarding refunds, federal regulations shall supersede the state refund regulations stated in this rule.
3. Where a student, having paid the required tuition for a term, dies during that term (prior to or on the last day of examinations of the college the student was attending), all tuition and fees for that term may be refunded to the estate of the deceased.
4. The college shall follow the described in Item (1) above for classes which the college collects receipts that are not required to be deposited in the State Treasury account.
5. All optional fees (lab fee, activity fee, technology fee or other fees as approved by the MCC Board of Trustees) will be refunded only in the event of a 100% withdrawal by the student prior to the beginning of the semester/term or in the event that a student’s class is cancelled due to insufficient enrollment.
6. All student refunds shall be disbursed within two weeks from receipt in the Business Office.

Refunds for Called-to-Duty Military Personnel: Upon request of the student, MCC shall grant a full refund of tuition and fees to military reserve and National Guard personnel called to active duty or active duty personnel who have received temporary or permanent reassignments as a result of military operations then taking place outside the state of North Carolina that make it impossible for them to complete their course requirements; and buy back textbooks through the colleges’ bookstore operations to the extent possible. MCC shall use distance learning technologies and other educational methodologies to help these students, under the guidance of faculty and administrative staff, complete their course requirements.

Federal Refund Policy: The Federal Refund Policy applies to all students receiving federal financial aid funds including those who qualify for the state refund policy mentioned above. This policy requires the school to determine the amount of Title IV aid a student has earned. The earned amount is determined by calculating the number of class days prior to the date of withdrawal. The unearned portion must be returned. This may require repayment by the student of all or part of any federal money received by the student. Refunds will be allocated, by law, according to the following order: (1) Federal Pell grant; (2) Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG); (3) other assistance under this Title for which a return of funds is required. Students may obtain further information regarding Title IV refund policies and refund calculations from the Financial Aid Office.


FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

All financial aid awards at Montgomery Community College are dependent upon available funding. The primary purpose of student aid is to provide financial resources to students who have been deemed unable to cover the entire expense of a post-secondary education. Such need-based aid is available in the form of grants and scholarships: Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), federal work study programs (FWS), North Carolina Community College Grant (NCCCG), North Carolina Education Lottery Scholarship (NCES), North Carolina Student Incentive Grant (SIG), Targeted Assistance funds, and state and institutional scholarships.
To apply for financial aid, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). These forms are available in the Student Services Division at the College and on the internet at www.fafsa.gov or on the College’s website at www.montgomery.edu. This federal application for aid considers a student’s household income and the number of household family members in determining a student’s financial need.

The FAFSA application is the only application a student needs to complete to be considered for Pell, FSEOG, FWS, NCCCG, NCELS, SIG, Targeted Assistance funds and MCC Scholarships. When completing the application, students should place MCC’s federal school code (008087) under the school information section on the FAFSA. Once the FAFSA is completed and submitted to the U.S. Department of Education, the results are forwarded to both the College and the student. The financial aid staff will contact students to discuss the results of their application.

MCC also receives limited funds from the North Carolina State Child Care Grant. Financial assistance for child care services may be available to applicants who meet certain federal guidelines. The amount of child care assistance awarded is dependent upon available funding.

All students receiving federal and/or state aid must meet all eligibility requirements. In particular, students must have all high school and post-secondary transcripts on file at MCC. Furthermore, all students must maintain satisfactory academic progress (SAP) in order to receive aid for which they have been deemed financially eligible. These specific guidelines and regulations are listed in the Financial Assistance Handbook and in the Academic Policies and Information section of this Catalog (See SAP for Financial Aid.).

Financial aid files are not complete until the student receives a MCC Award Letter. Students must have a completed financial aid file and a MCC Award Letter before registration day or be prepared to pay tuition and fees. For financial aid to be guaranteed for the term, a student should have files completed as follows: by July 1 for Fall Semester; by November 1 for Spring Semester; or by April 1 for Summer Session.

VETERAN INFORMATION: MCC is approved by the North Carolina State Approving Agency for the enrollment of persons eligible for educational assistance benefits from the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA). Entitled veterans, eligible spouses and dependent children who have been fully accepted and have registered for classes may be certified to the U.S. DVA Regional Office as enrolled and in pursuit of an approved program of education.
The veteran student is responsible for requesting copies of transcripts from the last high school and all colleges attended. Official transcript(s) are required and must be sent directly from all previously attended schools to Montgomery Community College. Students cannot be certified to receive benefits until all transcripts have been received and evaluated.

MCC is a Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) and serves as a home college for servicemembers and their adult family members enrolling in degree programs that are part of the SOC system.

WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT (WIA): The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) is a federally funded program designed to assist students that are determined to be economically disadvantaged the opportunity to participate in an occupational training program. MCC offers training designed to prepare these individuals to successfully enter the workforce. For more information on WIA scholarships, contact the Montgomery County JobLink Career Center on the MCC campus in Building 100.

EDUCATIONAL POLICIES AND GUIDELINES

ACADEMIC ADVISORS
Academic advising is a process which assists students in the clarification of their life/career goals and in the development of educational plans for the realization of their goals. It is a decision-making process by which students realize their maximum educational potential through communication and information exchanges with an advisor. Academic advising is ongoing and multifaceted, and is the responsibility of both student and advisor. The advisor serves as a coordinator of learning experiences through course and career planning and as a consultant concerning class performance, problems, and college activities. The advisor also serves as an agent of referral to other campus agencies as necessary. Each student is assigned an academic advisor from his/her major field of study after acceptance.

ACADEMIC FORGIVENESS POLICY
The College recognizes that certain factors (age, maturity, preparation, etc.) play important roles in a student’s academic progress. Therefore, after a five (5) year period of time, below average performance on prior work attempted may be excluded from the student’s GPA. The student must submit a written request for academic forgiveness to the Vice President of Student Services.

ACADEMIC LOAD (CREDIT HOURS)
A full-time student is one who is enrolled in 12 or more hours of course work per term. Average full-time enrollment for most students will vary between 16 and 21 hours of credit. Students who wish to carry more than 22 credit hours must have approval from their academic advisor unless their curriculum requirements, as stated in the Catalog, require more than 22 hours in a particular term. This includes all credit hours from concurrent enrollment arrangements with other post-secondary institutions. Course schedules and course loads should be carefully planned through consultation with a counselor and approved by the student’s faculty advisor and the Vice President of Student Services.

Semester hours are awarded as follows: one semester hour of credit for each hour per week of class lecture, one semester hour of credit for each two or three hours per week of laboratory, one semester hour of credit for each ten hours per week of cooperative work experience, and one semester hour of credit for each three hours per week of clinical. Contact hours are the actual amount of time (clock hours) spent in class, shop, or lab for each course. Credit hours are the academic credit awarded and used for tuition and graduation purposes.

ADVANCED STANDING
Montgomery Community College has established procedures which may permit students to enter certain curriculum programs with advanced standing. The following means of awarding credits are approved, but are not used in GPA calculation and will generate no grade points.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS (AP): High School students have the opportunity to complete college-level courses while still in high school through an advanced placement program sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). CEEB examinations are offered in the high school by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). MCC will grant credit for CEEB Advanced Placement test scores for some courses. Successful completion of the exam (score of 3 or higher) is required for awarding credit. Students desiring credit must have their scores submitted to the MCC Registrar for evaluation.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT FOR EARNED HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS: Students may earn credit for college-level courses based on completion of specified high school courses through the North Carolina High School to Community College Articulation Agreement. The students must have earned a grade of A or B on the high school course and must have received a raw score of 80 or higher on the appropriate VoCATS exam.

To receive articulated credit, students must enroll at the community college within two years of their high school graduation date. For advanced placement procedures and a complete list of high school courses, contact an area high school counselor or the Registrar at MCC.

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP): Credit may be allowed for up to 25% of college work based on appropriate scores of the CLEP subject area exams. CLEP subject examinations are evaluated based on the American Council on Education’s (ACE) recommended scores where appropriate to the student’s program of study. Recommended scores may be obtained from the Admissions Officer or the Counselor.

CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS (CEUs): Students desiring to transfer credits into the curriculum division from a course completed through a Continuing Education program at an accredited post-secondary institution may do so according to the following guidelines:

1. The student must request that the Registrar/Assistant Registrar review his/her Continuing Education course work for possible transfer credit into a curriculum program.
2. Student Services staff will consult with the lead instructor of the student's curriculum program who will determine whether the courses or units are relevant to the curriculum program.
3. Credit hours will be awarded at a value of one-tenth (1/10) of the total contact hours successfully completed.
4. Continuing Education grades of S or P will be considered for credit; no CEUs will be used in computing the GPA.
5. No more than 25% of the curriculum's total credit hours required for graduation can be continuing education units.
6. Proficienty examinations may be required before transfer credits are awarded for CEUs.

CREDIT-BY-EXAMINATION: A student who can demonstrate proficiency in a subject area may request a credit-by-examination in that subject in order to accelerate his/her studies. However, no more than 25% of the program’s total credit hour requirement may be earned through the Credit-By-Exam process. A student requesting this type of credit must:

1. Register for the course according to regular registration procedures set forth by the College and pay the required tuition.
2. Complete the Application for Credit-By-Examination unless the course has been given prior approval to be administered on an individual or group basis.
3. Submit the completed application to the appropriate Program Head and Vice President of Instruction.
4. Schedule a time to complete the test with the assigned supervising instructor. The examination should be completed prior to the end of the drop/add period to afford the student the opportunity to add another class in its place. The credit-by-examination should be completed by the 10% reporting date of the term of application for credit to be awarded.
5. Complete a drop/add form if the examination is successfully completed. Tuition refunds will not be issued for credit hours earned through credit-by-examination.
6. The credit-by-examination may be attempted only once for each course. A student who has previously received a grade of D, F, or I for the course is not eligible to attempt a credit-by-examination for that course.

TRANSFER OF CREDITS: Applicants wishing to transfer credit from another accredited institution of higher education must request official transcripts showing credit earned before any evaluation toward credit can be made. No grade lower than a C may be transferred. All course credit will be evaluated on merit and relevance. Course credit over ten years old must be approved by the Vice President of Student Services. Some courses with a technical or skill content have a five-year time limitation on the acceptance of transfer credit. This includes credits earned at MCC as well as other post-secondary institutions. The program heads determine the specific courses under this category. In such instances, students may complete proficiency examinations, when appropriate and available, to receive credit for those courses. For Dental Assisting and Practical Nursing students, major courses and Anatomy and Physiology credits must have been completed within the last three years prior to enrollment to be considered for credit. The College reserves the right to accept or reject credits earned at other institutions or to require the successful completion of appropriate proficiency through the Credit-By-Examination Policy before awarding credits. The final decision on transfer credit is determined by the Vice President of Student Services.

MCC is a Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) and serves as a home college for service members and their adult family members enrolling in degree programs that are part of the SOC system. SOC schools recognize and use the ACE Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services and award credit for appropriate learning acquired in military service at levels consistent with ACE Guide recommendations and/or those transcripted by the Community College of the Air Force.

ADVERSE WEATHER POLICY (MCC CLOSING)
Adverse (severe) weather may include snow, sleet, freezing rain, severe thunderstorms, flooding, tornadoes, hurricanes, etc. Should it be necessary to close the College due to severe or adverse weather conditions, announcements will be made via the AlertNow system to telephone numbers for those who have completed the AlertNow opt-in documents, and on the radio and television stations listed below. Additionally, if there is electrical power at the College, a message will be placed on the MCC telephone (voice mail) system.

Television Channels
WBTV 3: Charlotte WFMY 2: Greensboro
WSOC 9: Charlotte WGHP 8: Greensboro
WRAL 5: Raleigh
Radio Stations
WABZ 100.9 FM: Albemarle WMAG 99.5 FM: Greensboro
WZKY 1580 AM: Albemarle WQMG 97.1 FM: Greensboro
WSPC 1010 AM: Albemarle WHSL 100.3 FM: Greensboro
WSOC 103.7 FM: Charlotte WJRM 1390 AM: Troy

ATTENDANCE
Students are expected to attend all scheduled classes for which they are registered. Although special circumstances may cause a student to be absent, regular attendance is essential to satisfy regular course objectives. Students who anticipate an absence should contact the instructor before the class meets. Should prior notice to the instructor be impossible, the student should expect to explain the absence upon return to class.

All work missed during absences must be made up. Failure to make up work which is missed will adversely affect the student’s final grade for the course. To receive credit for a course, a student must attend 80% of class and 80% of lab hours. When absences total more than 20% of the total contact hours for the course, a student will be dropped from a class. If extenuating circumstances exist, the student may submit an appeal and request readmission to the class. The Vice President of Instruction will review the appeal and make the final determination concerning readmission.

When students are absent from class excessively, the instructor should initiate follow-up procedures by (1) contacting the student, and (2) notifying Student Services prior to the student missing 20% of the class. Additionally, instructors must notify Student Services in writing (Unofficial Drop Form) when dropping a student from their class.

CAMPUS SECURITY ACT
In 1990, the Campus Security Act was signed into law. The implications of the law affect, to some extent, all postsecondary institutions. More importantly, it involves the entire campus community in responding to crime incidents that occur on campus.

In 1998, the Campus Security Act was amended and renamed the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. The Act requires MCC to prepare and distribute to all current faculty, staff, and students an annual report which sets forth our policies on crime prevention issues and provide statistics on the number of specific, violent crimes (murder and non-negligent manslaughter and negligent manslaughter, forcible and non-forcible sexual offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, arson, motor vehicle thefts, and hate crimes) which have occurred on campus and also the number of arrests on campus for liquor law violations, drug use violations, and weapons possession. The annual report is available at https://www.montgomery.edu/college-information.html and printed copies are available from the Business Office.


CAREER INFORMATION
Students, alumni and citizens in the community should be able to make informed career decisions and develop well-organized job portfolios with the assistance of MCC and the Montgomery County JobLink Career Center. Free services include career and personal assessments, employment readiness preparation, job placement assistance, resume preparation, and career counseling. Students and job seekers have access to resources that provide extensive career exploration and job searches. Customers also have access to representatives from the Employment Security Commission, Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Social Services, Montgomery County Schools, Troy Housing Authority, and Youth Support Services, as well as MCC services. The Center is located on the MCC campus and is open from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

CATALOG OF RECORD
Montgomery Community College operates under the semester system. Fall and Spring semesters are each sixteen weeks in length. Summer sessions are eight weeks in length. Students in continuous attendance (summer term excepted) may graduate under the provisions of the catalog in effect on their date of entry into their current curriculum or under the requirements of a subsequent issue. Students not in continuous attendance must graduate under the provisions of the catalog in effect on their last entry date into the curriculum or subsequent issues. The catalog of record for a student who does a change of major is the catalog in effect at the time the change of major is effective.

CHILDREN ON CAMPUS
To guard against the disruption of MCC’s educational environment, children of students should not be brought to campus while the student is attending classes, labs, seminars, workshops, testing/orientation session, and computer or library labs/sessions. Children of employees should not be brought to campus during the employee’s regular working hours. Children of visitors must be supervised by the parent or guardian while on campus or at any approved off-campus class site. The College assumes no responsibility for children, or for any accidents or injury incurred by children in an unsupervised situation not approved by the college administration.

CIVIL RIGHTS COMPLAINTS (DUE PROCESS)
Students who feel they have been deprived of their civil rights should express their grievance in writing to their advisor with a copy going to the MCC Human Resources (HR) Coordinator. Should the complaint involve the advisor in such a way that the student feels he/she cannot take the complaint to the advisor, then the initial written complaint may be made directly to the HR Coordinator. If the HR Coordinator is unable to resolve the complaint, the student may appeal in writing to the Montgomery Community College Ad Hoc Compliance Committee. This committee is composed of the Vice President of Instruction, Vice President of Student Services, and two other representatives to be designated by the President of the College.

If the Committee is unable to resolve the complaint, further institutional appeal may be made in writing directly to the President of the College. If the complaint remains unresolved, the student may appeal to the MCC Board of Trustees as outlined in the Student Conduct and Code section of the Student Handbook (Student Grievance Procedure). Further appeals may be made directly to the Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Dept. of Education, 101 Marietta Tower Suite 2300, Atlanta, GA 30323.

CLASS/PROGRAM CANCELLATIONS
Montgomery Community College makes every effort to meet the needs and desires of its students. However, special circumstances may require the College to cancel classes or programs due to insufficient enrollment or funding. The College reserves the right to make such decisions as warranted. Students will receive 100% tuition refunds in the event of class or program cancellations or students may choose another class or program.

COUNSELING AND ASSESSMENT SERVICES
Professional counselors provide counseling services designed to give assistance to students in the areas of academics, researching college transfer opportunities, and in resolving personal issues and/or crises as they relate to the student’s education. Information concerning entrance and graduation requirements, financial assistance, employment trends and job opportunities, transfer opportunities, labor market information, student activities and appropriate referral to support agencies are some of the services provided. Additionally, referral to support agencies when needed is another service provided. Students are seen on a walk-in basis or by appointment made with the Counselor, whose office is located in Building 100.

Academic and career counseling is provided to assist students in understanding the various types of curriculum programs available at the College. Clarification of program qualifications and prerequisites are carefully explained. Academic tutorial assistance may be provided to students who may be in jeopardy of academic failure. A peer tutorial program gives students an opportunity to receive one-on-one assistance in a course. This is a free service provided for students by the College. Students should consult their instructors prior to seeking academic assistance. Students are encouraged to contact the Counselor early in the semester to arrange for tutorial assistance or to sign up as a peer tutor.

Transfer counseling is provided to assist students who are interested in transferring to a four-year institution. Inquiries made concerning transfer options are forwarded to the Director of Academic Advising. The Director is available to answer specific questions about the appropriate courses to take for transfer. More information is available on the College’s website (www.montgomery.edu) under Academic Advising.

Personal counseling is provided to assist students in career/decision-making skills, job-seeking skills, employment referrals, assessment and testing, and personal/life skills. When necessary and with the student’s permission, the Counselor may make referrals to community resources and/or agencies if additional assistance is needed to secure academic success while enrolled at the College. These services are provided to ensure academic success for each student while enrolled at the College.

Counseling Services staff conducts all assessment services for COMPASS. The results of this assessment instrument is used to advise students on the appropriate English, reading, and math courses needed. The counseling staff conducts other assessments that may be required for specific curriculum programs. In addition, COPS, and Self-Directed Search assessments are given to students that need assistance in career development.

CURRICULUM COURSE REPETITION POLICY
A student may repeat courses in which he/she has earned a grade below a C in an effort to earn a higher grade or raise the overall grade point average. The higher of the grades will be used as the grade of record in computing the cumulative grade point average. All grades received will remain on the student’s transcript. A student may repeat for credit or audit a course in which he/she has made a C or higher or has previously audited only one time in a five-year period. A course may not be taken twice during the same term on either a credit or at audit basis. However, a student may add to his/her mastery of course content by enrolling for the class upon recommendation of the instructor and approved by the Vice President of Instruction. Regular tuition charges apply for students repeating the class excessively and the college may not report membership hours. Any student who has completed a course with a grade of C or better may not displace a new student for the course.

COURSE RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of 25% of the total number of credit hours required for graduation in a particular program must be taken at Montgomery Community College. No more than 75% of required credit hours can be accepted as transfer credit and/or credit-by-examination.

COURSE SUBSTITUTION POLICY
Substitution courses must be approved by the appropriate Program Head or the Vice President of Instruction. Course substitutions will be very limited and must be of a special nature. The College reserves the right to substitute courses whenever necessary and in the best interest of the students or the College. Course substitutions may not exceed 25% of the credit hours required for graduation.

CRIMINAL RECORD, DRUG TESTING & HEALTH SCREENING
Affiliating agencies used by selected MCC programs may require students to submit to criminal background checks, drug testing and/or health screening prior to or during participation in class, lab, clinical, or co-op experiences at their site. Students should be aware that progress toward graduation may be limited by any inability to meet the agency requirements for student placement.

EVENING PROGRAMS
The College offers evening programs which include many of the credit courses offered during the day, as well as non-credit courses primarily for personal enrichment or occupational upgrading or retraining. Credit courses at night allow the student who must work while attending school the opportunity to coordinate his/her school activities with employment.

FAMILY EDUCATIONAL RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT (FERPA)
The release of personal information pertaining to curriculum students is under the general supervision of the Vice President of Student Services. To safeguard the welfare of each student, personal information is given only to authorized individuals as specified in the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974. The Act provides many safeguards regarding the confidentiality of and access to student records. For more information, consult the MCC Student Handbook.

1. Students may review their educational records by making a written request to the Registrar.
2. Student records will not be reviewed by third parties unless permission is obtained in writing from the student. Exceptions may be made for instructors and administrators if the information is for educational purposes. Exceptions may also be made for parents who claim the students as dependents and for auditing or accrediting organizations. The Vice President of Student Services will make the final decision concerning access to records.
3. Official transcripts will be issued only when a written request is received from the student. Transcripts from high schools or other colleges will not be released.
4. MCC does not publish or distribute any personally identifiable information unless mandated by legislative action.

FIRST AID
First aid kits are located in the hallways of all campus facilities. All accidents should be reported to the instructor and to the Student Services Division.

FOOD SERVICE
Food service is available Monday through Thursday at the café in Building 100. The café offers a variety of menu options including daily specials, hot meals, and sandwiches at affordable prices.

GRADING SYSTEM
Montgomery Community College uses a grade-point system to determine each student’s academic standing. This standing is determined by the Grade-Point Average (GPA). To determine the GPA, numerical values called “grade points” or “quality points” are assigned to each grade. Grade points are assigned for each letter. A letter grade is used to indicate the quality of a student’s work in a course. The grading system is listed below.

Grade Explanation Quality Points per Credit Hour
A (93-100) Outstanding 4
B (86-92) Above Average 3
C (78-85) Average 2
D (70-77) Passing 1
F (Below 70) Failure 0
AP Advanced Placement 0
AU Audit of a Course 0
CE Credit by Proficiency Exams 0
CT Credit by Transfer 0
FA Failure Due to Non-Attendance 0
I Incomplete 0
NG No Grade Issued by Instructor 0
S Satisfactory Progress 0
U Unsatisfactory 0
W Official or Administrative Withdrawal  0

An asterisk (*) immediately following a grade indicates that the course is not applicable to the student’s current program of study or is a developmental course. These grades are not included in the totals for GPA calculations.

Although quality points are not awarded for marks of AP, CE, and CT, students receiving these grades do earn the appropriate credit hours according to the course’s assigned value. A grade of Incomplete (I) will be given when circumstances justify additional time to complete the course. Any incomplete grade not removed by the end of the succeeding term will be changed to a grade of F unless additional time is granted by the instructor. A grade of Incomplete will not be considered for credit hours attempted until the grade is changed by the instructor or is reverted to a grade of F due to lack of proper action by the student. The student will be informed of variations in the grading system during the first week of class. Exception: Special Credit students may be given a grade of W (withdrawal) on the course(s) without officially withdrawing.

GRADE CONTESTING POLICY
All students enrolled in classes at Montgomery Community College have the right to contest grades assigned to them. The following procedures should be followed:

1. Students should schedule an appointment to discuss the matter with the instructor who has assigned the grade and request that the instructor review the basis for the grade. If the disagreement about the grade is resolved in this discussion, grade change action, where needed, should originate through the instructor.
2. If not resolved here, the student may present his/her case in writing to the appropriate Program Head.
3. A final review may be made by the Vice President of Instruction in consultation with the Vice President of Student Services and/or all individuals involved. If the grade is declared invalid and set aside, the student may be given a comprehensive examination by the department involved to establish a grade.

The right to contest a grade expires at the end of the term following the one in which the grade was assigned. The time limit will be waived only in unusual circumstances. When a student contests a grade assigned by an instructor no longer employed by the College, Step One above does not apply. The Grade Contesting Policy should be followed to prevent future academic probation or suspension action. This is the first step in the appeals process for academic probation and suspension policies.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
A student must:

1. Satisfy course requirements by completing at least 25% of the semester credit hours in a degree, diploma or certificate program through instruction offered by the institution awarding the degree.
2. Be enrolled at MCC during the term for which program requirements are completed. This may be waived only when extenuating circumstances exist and with the approval of the Vice President of Student Services and the appropriate instructor. MCC is a Servicemembers Opportunity College [SOC] and serves as a home college for servicemembers and their adult family members enrolling in degree programs that are part of the SOC system which provides for a waiver of this requirement.
3. Complete the prescribed courses to meet the minimum number of credit hours required for a degree, diploma, or certificate.
4. Possess a program GPA of at least 2.00.
5. Remove all financial obligations to MCC.

HONORS AND AWARDS

ALL-AMERICAN SCHOLAR PROGRAM: The All-American Scholar program includes students who have earned a 3.30 or higher grade point average. Students are nominated by faculty and Student Services staff.

ALL-USA ACADEMIC TEAM: The All-USA Academic Team includes students who are pursuing an Associate of Arts or Associate in Applied Science degree. Students must have a cumulative grade-point average of not less than 3.25.

DEAN’S LIST: The Dean’s List is composed of students who are enrolled for at least 12 semester hours credit, excluding developmental studies hours and proficiency hours, and earn a GPA of at least 3.00 in their major for the term with no incomplete grades and no grade lower than a B.

HONORS LIST: The Honors List is composed of students who are enrolled for 6-11 semester hours credit, excluding developmental studies hours and proficiency hours, and earn a GPA of at least 3.00 in their major for the term with no incomplete grades and no grade lower than a B.

MINORITY LEADERSHIP AWARDS: MCC Minority Leadership Awards include students who have demonstrated dependability, citizenship, leadership, enthusiasm, responsibility and support of MCC. A minimum grade point average of 3.00 is required. Students are recommended by faculty and Student Services staff.

PHI THETA KAPPA (PTK): The purpose of Beta Xi Omicron Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at MCC shall be the promotion of scholarship, the development of leadership and service and the cultivation of fellowship among qualified students of the college. In addition to meeting membership eligibility requirements as stated in Article IV and Chapter 1 of the PTK Constitution and Bylaws, each candidate for membership must have completed 12 semester hours of associate degree coursework, with a GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, and adhere to the school conduct code and possess recognized qualities of citizenship.

PRESIDENT’S LIST: The President’s List is composed of students who are enrolled for at least 12 semester hours credit, excluding developmental studies hours and proficiency hours, and earn a GPA of 4.00 in their major for the term with no incomplete grades.

WHO’S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES & COLLEGES: Students are chosen for nomination to Who’s Who on the basis of scholarship ability, participation and leadership in academic and extracurricular activities, citizenship and service to Montgomery Community College, and potential for future achievement.


HOUSING
Since the College has no dormitory facilities, students who wish to live away from home must make their own living arrangements. The College takes no responsibility for locating or supervising student housing. Students are encouraged to use information posted on student bulletin boards, local newspapers, and a list of local realtors as tools in obtaining housing.

INDEPENDENT STUDY
Students may, if unusual circumstances exist, register for Independent Study in some classes. Students must complete the Application for Independent Study and obtain approval from the supervising instructor, Program Head, and the Vice President of Instruction. Completed applications should be submitted to the Registrar at least one week prior to the student registering. After a student is registered for an independent study class, he/she must arrange a study time with the instructor of the class and must meet with the instructor at least once prior to the 10 percent reporting date for the class. Students not following this procedure will be dropped from the independent study class. The student’s registration form may show a scheduled time for independent study. However, the time is used for computer purposes only and may not be the actual time a student is meeting with the instructor. Each meeting time is individually scheduled by the instructor with each student registered for independent study. The fees charged for independent study are the same as those fees charged for in-class credit courses. Certain curricula, because of special requirements, may not be approved for independent study. Those students receiving veteran benefits or financial aid may not be eligible for independent study for pay purposes except when approved for special study.

INMATE EDUCATION
Montgomery Community College offers educational programs and courses to the residents of Southern Correctional Institution, the local prison system.

JOB REFERRAL SERVICES
MCC houses the Montgomery County JobLink Career Center in Building 100. JobLink is a partnership of several agencies that collaborate to bring workforce development and preparedness to individuals in the community at a one-stop-shop location. Partners include Montgomery County Schools, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Employment Security Commission, Troy Housing Authority, Richmond County Support Services, Department of Social Services, MCC, and Regional Consolidated Services (Local Area).

ORIENTATION
All new students are expected to participate in an orientation program conducted by the Student Services Staff. The purpose of orientation is to acquaint the student with the campus, faculty, student leaders, and support services, as well as to discuss policies and regulations of the College. Topics may include: calendar of events, student conduct, academic advising process, financial assistance, veteran benefits, student activities, attendance policy, withdrawal from class or college, grading system, grade reports, refund policy, placement policy, counseling services, transitional studies program, high school and GED completion information (when applicable), SGA, policies and procedures regarding educational records and privacy of those records, and procedural due process.

REGISTRATION
Courses are offered as outlined in each program area. Each individual must officially register for each course he/she attends. Registration is held at designated times each term as indicated in the Academic Calendar. Student Services will notify new applicants concerning times and other special registration procedures.

Registration is complete when all fees are paid or deferred by the Business Office and the student is issued a receipt. The receipt and registration form must be presented to each instructor upon enrolling in any course. No person can participate in or attend any course unless he/she is officially registered. Students attending class for which they are not officially registered will receive neither grade nor semester hour credit for the course. Classes missed due to late registration will be counted as absences.
Registration is complete when all fees are paid or deferred by the Business Office and the student is issued a receipt. The receipt and registration form must be presented to each instructor upon enrolling in any course. No person can participate in or attend any course unless he/she is officially registered. Students attending class for which they are not officially registered will receive neither grade nor semester hour credit for the course. Classes missed due to Late Registration will be counted as absences.

RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE
MCC recognizes the existence of diversity in religious beliefs. Out of respect for individual religious convictions, the College will allow two excused days of absence per academic year. At least two weeks prior to the leave, the student must submit in writing to all of his/her instructors for the term what day(s) he/she requests as a religious observance. The student will be given the opportunity to make up any class work, clinical/co-op hours, or tests missed during the excused day(s).

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS
Social Security Numbers are used for the purpose of record and file identification only. Applications submitted without a Social Security Number require additional processing. If you choose not to disclose your SSN, entry of your application may be delayed. In addition, you should be aware that for some purpose (for example tuition tax credit documents such as 1098T and federal financial aid), social security numbers are required.


STANDARDS OF PROGRESS

ACADEMIC STANDARDS OF PROGRESS: Each student is expected to maintain satisfactory academic progress toward a degree, diploma or certificate. At the end of each term, a student’s GPA for that term and their cumulative GPA are examined. Special standards of progress for Practical Nursing, Dental Assisting, and Medical Assisting students are published in the respective handbooks for these majors. Standards for students enrolled in allied health programs supersede standards for students enrolled in other programs at MCC.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA) TO DETERMINE STANDARDS OF PROGRESS: The GPA is computed by dividing the total quality points earned by the total credit hours attempted. A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 will be placed on academic probation. To satisfy graduation requirements, a 2.00 cumulative GPA is required for all degree, diploma, and certificate programs.
ACADEMIC PROBATION: Students whose academic progress is unsatisfactory as determined by the program GPA will be placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation are required to consult with a counselor and may be required to reduce their course load, repeat courses, or register for transitional studies classes to strengthen their educational background. Students failing to see a counselor by the end of the term in which they are notified of probationary status will not be allowed to re-enroll for the next term. Students may remove themselves from academic probation by reestablishing the minimum GPA standing for credit hours attempted.

ACADEMIC SUSPENSION: Each term students remain on academic probation, they must earn at least a C average or better until the GPA standard is met. Failure to earn this average may result in academic suspension for a period of at least one term. For pay purposes, veterans and financial aid recipients may not be continued in certified status beyond one term while below the standards of progress required to graduate without special counseling and approval. The Student Services Counselor and the student’s academic advisor will determine specific guidelines for the removal of academic deficiencies and the conditions for the student to continue his/her program of study.

ACADEMIC PROBATION: Students whose academic progress is unsatisfactory as determined by the program GPA will be placed on academic probation. Students on academic probation are required to consult with a conselor and may be required to reduce their course load, repeat courses, or register for transitional studies classes to strengthen their educational background. Students failing to see a counselor by the end of the term in which they are notified of robationary status will not be allowed to re-enroll for the next term. Students may remove themselves from academic probation by re-establishing the minimum GPA standing for credit hours attempted. 

APPEALS PROCESS FOR ACADEMIC PROBATION & SUSPENSION: The Grade Contesting Policy should be followed to prevent future academic probation/suspension action. This is the first step in the appeals process for academic probation and suspension policies. At the discretion of the Counselor and with concurrence of the appropriate advisor, students may request a waiver of the one term suspension to continue studies, provided the Counselor and advisor determine the need for additional time for proper adjustment to the academic environment.

REINSTATEMENT FROM ACADEMIC SUSPENSION: Students must make a written request for reinstatement after having been on suspension for a minimum of one term. For the term following reinstatement, students must take the appropriate course work determined by the Counselor and may be subject to dismissal for one academic year for that particular program of study if they fail to meet conditions stipulated by the Counselor. Entry into another program of study during a suspension period may be approved only by the Student Services Counselor. No student may be reinstated from academic suspension more than two times over any consecutive three year period in the same program of study.

 

Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Title IV regulations require that each student receiving federal aid maintain satisfactory academic progress. Satisfactory progress is measured by both a qualitative and a quantitative standard. The MCC SAP is outlined below and measures all credits included in a student's academic history {all MCC college credits (even those taken during high school), transfer credits, & remedial credits}, regardless of whether financial aid has been previously received. *Remedial credit will not be counted in a student's completion rate or 150% calculation, only in G.P.A.

Increment 1: 0 - 24 credit hours attempted (measured at the end of the semester)
Completion rate required: 60% Required GPA: 1.75                         Your Current Progress ______________________

Increment 2: 25+ credit hours attempted (measured at the end of the semester)
Completion rate required: 67% Required GPA: 2.00                         Your Current Progress ______________________

The financial aid GPA/completion rate may differ from the GPA on the student's academic record due to the addition of remedial coursework. The SAP calculation is based on the financial aid GPA/completion rate. There are no exceptions.

Financial Aid Terms and Conditions

Both a Quantitative (cumulative completion rate) and Qualitative (cumulative GPA) standard must be maintained to receive aid. The cumulative completion rate is calculated by dividing the completed credit hours by the attempted credit hours. SAP will be evaluated each semester after grades have been recorded by the registrar. (Successfully completed grades: A, B, C, D, P, S, CE --Unsuccessful grades: F, FA, R, RA, I, W, AU, NA) All students receiving aid must successfully meet the required standards for each increment listed above. Failure to meet these standards may impact the student's eligibility for financial aid and ability to register. For purposes of rounding, students who receive a completion rate of 66.5% or higher are considered to have met the 67% completion rate requirement.

150 PERCENT RULE: Students are only allowed to attempt a limited number of credit hours under federal financial aid guidelines. All aid is terminated once a student has attempted 150% of the required number of hours in their program of study or it becomes apparent that they can not complete the program within the 150% limit. This regulation applies to all students, including those that have not previously received aid. For example, if the degree requires 70 hours to complete, the 150% maximum timeframe would be 105 attempted hours. For diploma students, if the diploma requires 40 hours to complete, the maximum timeframe would be 60 attempted semester hours. Up to thirty (30) hours of remedial coursework will not be included in this calculation. Students must make other arrangements to pay their educational costs if their financial aid is terminated. Students pursuing a second major after graduation may be considered for appeal. REMINDER: All attempted credits count toward the 150% point even if they are not included in your current active curriculum.

LIMITS ON FINANCIAL AID ELIGIBILITY: Students who are enrolled in two concurrent curriculum programs (major/minor) will receive funding for eligible classes in their primary program (major). An exception occurs if the student is completing their primary program and is beginning another curriculum program during the same semester. In that case, the student will receive funding for both curriculum programs for that semester only. All additional curriculums must be approved by appeal from the Financial Aid Office.
A student may receive aid for up to two (2) one-year diplomas or two (2) associate degrees. After a student has completed two degrees, two diplomas, or one degree and one diploma they are no longer eligible to receive financial aid at MCC. Note: Certificates not leading to a diploma or degree count as one completed degree.
REMINDER: After receiving financial aid for 12 full time semesters students will no longer be eligible for aid from the federal government.

WITHDRAWAL: All courses attempted are used in calculating the SAP. Withdrawals ("W") and grades of "F", "AU", "FA", "R', "RA", "I" count as hours attempted, but do not count towards successfully completed hours. If a student changes curriculums, all of the courses previously attempted will apply to the current SAP calculation. Grades of "F", "FA", "R', "RA" affect the student's G.P.A. Students who withdraw may have difficulty meeting the satisfactory academic progress requirements.

ACADEMIC AMNESTY: Academic progress regulations do not provide for the concept of academic amnesty whereby students apply to have credits attempted or grades earned excluded from the institutions GPA calculation. All credits attempted and grades earned will be included in the students GPA and pace of progression standards.

TRANSFER CREDITS: In addition to being factored into the completion rate requirement as attempted and completed credits, a student's maximum time to receive financial aid will also be reduced by the equivalent transfer of credit hours towards his/her degree. Transfer credit is determined by the registrar. Credits needed for the current curriculum will be added to the transcript at the time of admission to MCC. Each time the curriculum changes the registrar will reevaluate all transcripts on file to determine what new courses could be counted towards graduation. Once transfer credits have been added they will not be removed.

WARNING: A student is placed on warning when SAP is not maintained. A student on warning may receive financial aid for their next enrollment term, but must return to satisfactory academic progress within the allowed term or the student will be terminated from financial aid eligibility. Students who are ineligible for aid under the 150% rule do not qualify for a warning period.

WARNING NEAR MAXIMUM TIMEFRAME: Students who have attempted the maximum allowable credit hours, 150%, of their program of study will have their financial aid suspended. Students have the right to appeal.

SUSPENSION/REGAINING ELIGIBILITY FOR AID: Students on a warning status who fail to meet the standards outlined above are ineligible for aid. Excepting an approved appeal request, the only manner by which a student may regain eligibility is by completing classes at their own expense and achieving the minimum SAP requirements.

APPEAL: All students are eligible to appeal their financial aid suspension status in writing to the Financial Aid Office. To appeal, the student must complete and return the appeal form found on our website or in our office to the Financial Aid Office. All supporting documentation must be attached or the appeal will not be accepted. Appeals are presented to the Financial Aid Committee for adjudication. The student will be notified by email/mail. All aid remains terminated until the student receives notification that the appeal was approved for the next period of enrollment and the student agrees in writing to the conditions of appeal. Appeals are granted only in documented cases of serious illness, death of an immediate family member, natural disaster, or other traumatic episode.

PROBATION: If a status of Suspension is appealed and approved, a status of Probation is assigned. This status requires students to maintain both a term GPA greater than or equal to 2.5, a term completion rate equal to 100% and to comply with all conditions of appeal. In order to achieve a completion rate equal to 100%, a student must successfully complete each course enrolled for the term. If a student withdraws or fails a course during a term dropping the term completion rate below 100%, does not maintain a term GPA greater than or equal to 2.5, or meet all conditions of appeal agreed upon in writing, the appeal is terminated and the student will receive a terminated status. Once a student receives a termination status they are no longer eligible to appeal without regaining eligibility first.

REMEDIAL CLASSES: Remedial classes count toward the financial aid GPA calculation. Students may receive aid for 30 remedial credit hours only. If one or more modules of a remedial math shell is passed, but the complete shell is failed the student will be charged again for a total shell when they register. The financial aid GPA/Completion rate may differ from the GPA on the student's academic record due to the addition of remedial coursework. The SAP calculation is based on the financial aid GPA/Completion rate. There are no exceptions. *Up to 30 hours of remedial coursework will be excluded from the 150% maximum timeframe calculation.

REPEATING COURSES: Repeating a course is allowed when the student fails to earn a passing grade. However, repeating a course counts as another attempt, which could negatively affect a student's SAP. Please note: A student may repeat a course one time in which they received a passing grade.

COURSES OUTSIDE THE CURRICULUM: It is the student's responsibility to register for courses in their program of study. Award amounts are based only on courses in a student's program of study.

CLOCK HOUR PROGRAMS: Students enrolled in clock hour programs (e.g. BLET) will have SAP evaluated at the end of each payment period. At the time of review, students must have successfully completed both the clock hours and weeks of instructional time required for the payment period. Maximum Timeframe is measured in cumulative clock hours required to complete the program and expressed in calendar time. (Note that a student in a clock hour program cannot receive aid for hours beyond those in the program; the maximum timeframe applies to the amount of calendar time the student takes to complete those hours.) For example, if the program is 1200 clock hours and meets 30 clock hours per week, that means the program is 40 weeks in length. 150% of 40 weeks is 60 weeks. A student may receive aid while enrolled in this program for up to 60 weeks to complete the 1200 clock hours required for graduation.

CLOCK HOUR CONVERTED PROGRAMS FOR PAYMENT: Awards will be modified for all diploma programs that do not lead to an associate degree (LPN, Dental Assisting, Taxidermy, BLET). If a student is in a clock hour converted program and attends courses in both mini-mesters payment is made for the cumulative total of hours for the semester. Clock hour conversions always round down to the closest whole number and payment is made on that number (ex: 5.1 + 6.4 = 11.5 is paid 11).

MINI-SEMESTER PAYMENT: A student will be paid after the first applicable census date for the amount of hours they are enrolled in, have attended, and have actively participated in. If a student subsequently adds a mini-mester course during the same term, the census date of the added course will become the student's latest census date. The student's aid will be adjusted to pay the amount of current enrollment including all courses added or withdrawn from.

NOTICE: Responsibility for registering for courses in one's program of study, monitoring the progression toward graduation, and avoiding SAP ineligibility lies with the student. When students enroll at MCC, they choose their course of study and have ready access to the course requirements. While MCC provides advisement and counseling to students in an effort to facilitate a student's educational interests and goals, this SAP policy is mandated by the federal government and may not be altered, ignored, or regulated on the grounds of improper or misinterpreted advisement.

***All notices regarding academic progress for financial aid purposes will be sent to the email address found on the student's current FAFSA application. The student is responsible for monitoring this mailbox and/or updating their email address on the FAFSA. ****

The Financial Aid Office may adjust the student's award amount, pending changes in eligibility status or the availability of federal/state funds. The Financial Aid Office will certify the student's enrollment status at the end of the drop/add period for each semester. All awards will be adjusted at this time to reflect the student's actual enrollment status. If the student registers for classes they must officially drop the class(es) before the first day of class or they may be responsible for all charges incurred. Not all certificate programs are eligible for financial aid.

SUMMER SESSION: Credit hours attempted and completed during a summer session are included in the calculation of SAP. State funded financial aid is not available during summer session. Award amounts are based on full-time attendance for the fall and spring terms and will be pro-rated according to the number of registered hours.

Students are required to notify the financial aid office if they receive financial assistance such as a scholarship, grant, or loan from an outside source since this may affect their eligibility for financial aid. The student must also notify the financial aid office if they change their name, address, phone number or email. The College will use the students's financial aid funds to pay for outstanding tuition, fees, books and other charges incurred. Remaining funds will be disbursed during the semester. If the student receives aid they are not entitled to, it will be their responsibility to repay those funds. If a student is taking classes at two different colleges they can only receive aid at one college.

REPAYMENT OF TITLE IV FUNDS POLICY: Financial aid recipients who completely withdraw (officially/unofficial instructor drop/administrative drop) or fail to actively participate in all of their classes on or prior to the sixty percent point of the academic term will be subject to repayment terms (Return of Title IV funds policy) as outlined by the Department of Education. Simply logging into an online class does not count as participation. If disbursement has already been made to the student, it is the student’s responsibility to repay all funds due to MCC and/or the Department of Education. Federal regulations require a formula be used based on number of calendar days in the term and the number of days of active participation by the student before withdrawal to determine how much financial aid was ‘earned’ by the student. The difference between aid disbursed and aid earned will be used to calculate how much the student must repay. For complete information please visit our website:  https://www.montgomery.edu/financial-aid-handbookprocedures/penaltiesrepayment


STUDENT ATTIRE

Montgomery Community College frequently has prospective students, employers, legislative representatives, and other visitors on campus. Therefore, although MCC students may dress informally, they are encouraged to be clean and dress properly. To ensure safety and to minimize disruptions to other students, shirts and shoes are required at all times.

 


STUDENT CONDUCT
All students and staff have the right to a safe, peaceful, and honest educational environment. Therefore when, in the judgment of college officials, a student’s conduct disrupts or threatens to disrupt the college community, appropriate disciplinary action will be taken to restore and protect the safety, peace, and integrity of the community. Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with generally accepted standards of scholarship and conduct. The purpose of the Student Code is not to restrict student freedoms but to protect the rights of individuals in their academic pursuits. The Student Code is directed toward breeches of the Articles of Student Conduct as set forth in the Student Handbook.


STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA)
All curriculum students at MCC are members of the Student Government Association (SGA) and have the opportunity to participate in the organization and control of student affairs. The SGA is the official governing agency representing the students. Students receive experience in responsible citizenship through participation in SGA activities. Activities such as sports, dances, picnics, socials, and student publications are supervised and approved by the SGA, the SGA advisor, and the Vice President of Student Services, as well as the President’s Administrative Cabinet at the College.

SGA Clubs & Organizations. There are various clubs and organizations at MCC for students to join. Each club/organization has a faculty or staff advisor and an elected representative to the Student Government Association. More information on each club is available in the Student Handbook. MCC clubs/organizations are:

Alpha Beta Chi (Early Childhood) Club
Criminal Justice Club
Dental Assisting Club
Electrical/Electronics Club
Forestry Club
Gunsmithing Society
Human Services Club
Medical Assisting Club
Minority Male Mentoring Club
Phi Beta Lambda (PBL)
Phi Theta Kappa (PTK)
Pottery Club
Practical Nursing Club
Student Ambassadors
Trailblazers Shooting Team
Veteran's Club
Women of Empowerment


STUDENT LIFE
Students at Montgomery Community College have specific educational needs. They are learning a trade; learning for advancement on a present job; learning to read; expressing themselves on paper or on canvas; preparing to enter a four-year college; preparing for a new career; and learning because of intellectual curiosity. Some are employed full-time; some part-time; and some are unemployed or retired. Many have family and job responsibilities. From this diversity of people, comes one common factor – each is an individual with a desire to learn.

MCC offers a formal education in a relaxed atmosphere. Classrooms and restrooms are designed to be easily accessible to handicapped students. The café dining room in Building 100 is available where students may eat, relax, and visit with each other. Students may also gather in the Student Union where they will find arcade games, a ping pong table, and a soft-seating lounge area.


STUDENT RIGHTS & RESPONSIBILITIES
By entering classes at MCC, students take upon themselves certain responsibilities and obligations that include an honest attempt to academic performance and social behavior consistent with the lawful purpose of the College. Students maintain all legal rights of citizenship while enrolled and are expected to remember that they are present in a democratic and collegiate environment.
The reputation of the College rests upon the shoulders of students, as well as on the administration, staff, and faculty, and it is hoped that each student will maintain high standards of citizenship. The campus and College will not be a place of refuge or sanctuary for illegal or irresponsible behavior. Students, as all citizens, are subject to civil authority on and off the campus. Additionally, all students are responsible for the completion of their academic program. They must also maintain the required grade point average, know their academic standing, and meet all graduation requirements. Advisors and counselors are available to assist students, but final responsibility for program requirements rests with the student.


TRANSCRIPTS
Upon written request, the College will provide students with copies of their academic and financial aid transcripts. Students may receive or have transmitted copies of transcripts only on themselves. MCC reserves the right to deny transcripts or copies of records not required to be made available by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act in any of the following situations:
• the student has an unpaid financial obligation to the College;
• the student has an overdue library book(s), equipment, or materials belonging to the College; or
• there is an unresolved disciplinary action against the student.


TRANSFER OPPORTUNITIES

COMPREHENSIVE ARTICULATION AGREEMENT: In an effort to simplify and facilitate transfer of credit between community colleges and the University of North Carolina System, the University’s Board of Governors and the North Carolina Community College System have developed and approved a Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA). This agreement addresses the transfer of students between institutions in the North Carolina Community College System and from that system to constituent institutions of the University of North Carolina. The CAA applies to all North Carolina community colleges and all constituent institutions of the University of North Carolina System. CAA courses are identified in the Course Descriptions section of the College Catalog. Students must earn a grade of C or better for courses to transfer as part of the CAA.

ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS WITH OTHER PUBLIC AND PRIVATE INSTITUTIONS: Many private colleges and universities also accept courses for transfer credit and have their own means of evaluating the appropriateness of transfer credit. The receiving institution is the final authority regarding transfer credit. Students are advised to consult the Director of Academic Advising and the Admission Office at the senior institution for additional information.


TUTORIAL SERVICES
The College provides tutorial services for students who may be at risk of failing a course. Students interested in receiving or providing tutorial assistance should consult with the Counselor. Final authorization for tutorial services lies with the Vice President of Instruction and Vice President of Student Services.

The referral process may occur under the following conditions:
1. Instructor Referral - The instructor may refer a student to the Counselor for tutorial services based on the individual’s academic performance in class.
2. Student Referral - The student may refer themselves for tutorial services if they feel that they do not have a clear understanding of the course content, based on the results of the instructor’s academic assessment.


UNOFFICIAL DROP BY INSTRUCTOR
To receive credit for a course, a student must attend a minimum of 80% of class and 80% of lab hours; some programs have stricter attendance policies. When a student has missed two consecutive classes, the instructor will notify the Director of Counseling Services who will then conduct follow-up procedures in an attempt to determine the reason for the student’s absences. For students who are nearing the maximum number of allowable absences, an instructor must submit an Unofficial Drop Notice by Instructor. A student may also be dropped from a course for disciplinary reasons.

A student dropped for excessive absences or other reasons may submit an appeal to the Vice President of Instruction and request readmission to the class. The Vice President and the appropriate instructor will review the facts of the appeal, such as the reason for the absences and whether or not the student communicated with the instructor. Based on the results of the review, the Vice President will make the final determination concerning readmission. The grade issued for classes from which the student has been unofficially dropped is F; students may remove the grade of F by following the Official Withdrawal procedures.


WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE
A student who wishes to withdraw from the College or from an individual course should complete an official withdrawal form in Student Services. A student is not officially withdrawn until he/she processes a formal withdrawal form with the Registrar’s Office. The effective date of withdrawal is the date the Registrar’s Office receives the form. All required signatures should be obtained as indicated on the form. This will protect the student’s scholastic standing, his/her right to reenroll, and transfer credits. No student will be allowed to officially withdraw from any classes after the term has ended.

Failure to officially withdraw may result in a grade of F for the student on all courses for which he/she is enrolled. If a student completes the official withdrawal process, the student may be given a grade of W for his/her class(es). Quality points will not be computed nor credit given. A student who withdraws from a course or the College after the 75% point of the term may be given a grade of F on all courses. Quality points will be computed unless the withdrawal is due to circumstances beyond the student’s control. When extenuating circumstances exist, the Vice President of Student Services must approve the waiver of the grade of F.

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Curriculum Programs of Study

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Associate in Arts (AA)
An Associate in Arts degree consists of 64-65 Semester Hours Credit (SHC). The program is designed to parallel the freshman and sophomore level course work at a four-year college or university and to transfer toward a baccalaureate degree. The college transfer program is part of the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. This agreement addresses the transfer of students between institutions in the North Carolina Community College System and the institutions of the University of North Carolina System. Course work includes study in the areas of humanities and fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, and English composition. Opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic use of computers will be provided.


Associate in Applied Science (AAS)
An Associate in Applied Science degree consists of 64-76 SHC. Curriculum programs of study leading to an AAS degree are composed of collegiate level studies and are designed to prepare students for employment as technicians in semi-professional fields. Course work includes study in the areas of humanities and fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, and English composition. Opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic use of computers will be provided.


Associate in General Education (AGE)
The Associate in General Education degree consists of 64-76 SHC. The AGE curriculum is designed for individuals wishing to broaden their education, with emphasis on personal interest, growth and development. Course work includes study in the areas of humanities and fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, and English composition. Opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic use of computers will be provided.

Associate in Science (AS)
An Associate in Science degree consists of 64-65 Semester Hours Credit (SHC). The program is designed to parallel the freshman and sophomore level course work at a four-year college or university and to transfer toward a baccalaureate degree. The college transfer program is part of the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. This agreement addresses the transfer of students between institutions in the North Carolina Community College System and the institutions of the University of North Carolina System. Course work includes study in the areas of humanities and fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, and English composition. Opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic use of computers will be provided.


Diploma and Certificate Programs
A diploma program consists of 36-48 SHC; a certificate program consists of 12-18 SHC. These curricula are designed to prepare students for skilled or semi-skilled employment in a specific occupation. Diploma and/or certificate options are offered in some AAS degree programs, and credits earned from these options may be applied toward the higher level credential. These options are noted in the individual program sections of this catalog.


Foundational Studies
Foundational studies courses are designed to ensure student success in academic course work. These courses are scheduled for students who need college preparatory course work according to placement scores and who need to complete course requirements for entry into a specific curriculum. Foundational studies courses provide students with assistance through various instructional methodologies including computer-assisted instruction, classroom presentations, cooperative learning, tutoring to supplement the classroom experience, and peer-assisted review sessions. Classes may be offered in a classroom or laboratory setting and may incorporate multimedia materials to enhance the learning process. Foundational courses begin with course number of “0” (i.e. Eng 070). Tuition fees apply to these courses, and the courses carry credit hours; however, the credits earned in these courses do not apply to the credit hours required for graduation in degree programs of study.

Programs of Study

Accounting (A25100)
Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Technology (A35100)
Associate in Arts (A10100)
Associate in General Education (A10300)
Associate in Science (A10400)
Basic Law Enforcement Training (C55120)
Business Administration (A25120)
Computer Information Technology (A55180)
Computer Forensics Certificate
Criminal Justice Technology (A55180)
Foodservice Technology (D55250) (offered only at Southern Correctional Institution)
Dental Assisting (D45240)
Early Childhood Education (A55220)
Electrical Systems Technology (A35220)
Forest Management Technology (A15200)
Geographic Information Systems Certificate
Gunsmithing (AA30200)
Human Services Technology (A45380)
Human Services Technology/Developmental Disabilities (A4538A)
Hunting & Shooting Sports Management (A25600)
Infant/Toddler Care (C55290)
Medical Assisting (A45400)
Metal Engraving (D30240)
Office Administration (A25370)
Office Administration: Legal Concentration (A2537A)
Practical Nursing (D45660)
Professional Crafts: Clay (A30300)
School Age Care (C55450)
Taxidermy (D30380)


ACCOUNTING (A25100)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Accounting curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and the skills necessary for employment and growth in the accounting profession. Using the "language of business," accountants assemble and analyze, process, and communicate essential information about financial operations.

In addition to course work in accounting principles, theories, and practice, students will study business law, finance, management, and economics. Related skills are developed through the study of communications, computer applications, financial analysis, critical thinking skills, and ethics.

Graduates should qualify for entry-level accounting positions in many types of organizations including accounting firms, small businesses, manufacturing firms, banks, hospitals, school systems, and governmental agencies. With work experience and additional education, an individual may advance in the accounting profession.


AIR CONDITIONING, HEATING, AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY (A35100)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Technology curriculum provides the basic knowledge to develop skills necessary to work with residential and light commercial systems.

Topics include mechanical refrigeration, heating and cooling theory, electricity, controls, and safety. The diploma program covers air conditioning, furnaces, heat pumps, tools and instruments. In addition, the AAS degree covers residential building codes, residential system sizing, and advanced comfort systems.

Diploma graduates should be able to assist in the start up, preventive maintenance, service, repair, and/or installation of residential and light commercial systems. AAS degree graduates should be able to demonstrate an understanding of system selection and balance and advanced systems.


ASSOCIATE IN ARTS (A10100)
A.A. Degree

The Associate in Arts degree shall be granted for a planned program of study consisting of a minimum of 64 and a maximum of 65 semester hours of college transfer courses. (Ref. 23 NCAC 2E.0204) Within the degree program, the institution shall include opportunities for the achievement of competence in reading, writing, oral communication, fundamental mathematical skills, and the basic use of computers.

Courses are approved for transfer through the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement. Community college graduates who have earned 64 semester hours of academic credit in approved transfer courses with a grade of "C" or better in each course and an overall GPA of at least 2.0 on a 4.0 scale will receive at least 64 semester hours of academic credit upon admission to a university. Courses may also transfer through bilateral agreements between institutions. Courses offered through bilateral agreements may not transfer to all receiving institutions.


ASSOCIATE IN GENERAL EDUCATION (A10300)
Associate Degree

The Associate in General Education curriculum is designed for the academic enrichment of students who wish to broaden their education, with emphasis on personal interest, growth and development.

Through these skills, students will have a sound base for lifelong learning. Graduates are prepared for advancements within their field of interest and become better qualified for a wide range of employment opportunities.The Associate in General Education curriculum is designed for the academic enrichment of students who wish to broaden their education, with emphasis on personal interest, growth and development.


ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE (A10400)
Associate Degree

The Associate in Science program is designed to parallel the freshman and sophomore level course work at four-year colleges and universities within the University of North Carolina System and will transfer to these institutions toward a baccalaureate degree. The Associate in Science degree (A.S.) is designed for students who want to pursue a four-year degree in one of the liberal arts disciplines or at a professional school that requires a strong liberal arts background.


BASIC LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING (C55120)
Certificate

Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) is designed to give students essential skills required for entry-level employment as law enforcement officers with state, county, or municipal governments, or with private enterprise.

This program utilizes State commission-mandated topics and methods of instruction. General subjects include, but are not limited to, criminal, juvenile, civil, traffic, and alcohol beverage laws; investigative, patrol, custody, and court procedures; emergency responses; and ethics and community relations.

Students must successfully complete and pass all units of study which include the certification examination mandated by the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission and the North Carolina Sheriffs' Education and Training Standards Commission to receive a certificate.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (A25120)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Business Administration curriculum is designed to introduce students to the various aspects of the free enterprise system. Students will be provided with a fundamental knowledge of business functions, processes, and an understanding of business organizations in today's global economy.

Course work includes business concepts such as accounting, business law, economics, management, and marketing. Skills related to the application of these concepts are developed through the study of computer applications, communication, team building, and decision making.

Through these skills, students will have a sound business education base for lifelong learning. Graduates are prepared for employment opportunities in government agencies, financial institutions, and large to small business or industry.


HUNTING AND SHOOTING SPORTS MANAGEMENT (A25600)
A.A.S. Degree/Certificate

The Hunting and Shooting Sports Management curriculum is designed to prepare students for a career in hunting and shooting sports retail businesses.

Course work includes business concepts such as basic gunsmithing, buying and merchandising, advertising and sales promotion, introduction to shooting sports, gun shop management and sports hunting.

Graduates should be prepared for employment opportunities in large and small retail sporting centers, private shooting sports businesses, and shooting sports equipment manufacturing.


COMPUTER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (A25260)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Computer Information Technology curriculum is designed to prepare graduates for employment with organizations that use computers to process, manage, and communicate information. This is a flexible curriculum that can be customized to meet community information systems needs.

Course work will develop a student's ability to communicate complex technical issues related to computer hardware, software, and networks in a manner that computer users can understand. Classes cover computer operations and terminology, operating systems, database, networking, security, and technical support.

Graduates should qualify for employment in entry-level positions with businesses, educational systems, and governmental agencies which rely on computer systems to manage information. Graduates should be prepared to sit for industry-recognized certification exams.

GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS CERTIFICATE
(A Certificate offered through the Computer Information Technology program)


CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY (A55180)
A.A.S. Degree/Certificate

The Criminal Justice Technology curriculum is designed to provide knowledge of criminal justice systems and operations. Study will focus on local, state, and federal law enforcement, judicial processes, corrections, and security services. The criminal justice system's role within society will be explored.

Emphasis is on criminal justice systems, criminology, juvenile justice, criminal and constitutional law, investigative principles, ethics, and community relations. Additional study may include issues and concepts of government, counseling, communications, computers, and technology.

Employment opportunities exist in a variety of local, state, and federal law enforcement, corrections, and security fields. Examples include police officer, deputy sheriff, county detention officer, state trooper, intensive probation/parole surveillance officer, correctional officer, and loss prevention specialist.

To obtain employment as law enforcement officers, students must successfully complete Basic Law Enforcement Training.

COMPUTER FORENSICS CERTIFICATE
(A Certificate offered through the Criminal Justice Technology program)


DENTAL ASSISTING (D45240)
Diploma

The Dental Assisting curriculum prepares individuals to assist the dentist in the delivery of dental treatment and to function as integral members of the dental team while performing chairside and related office and laboratory procedures.

Course work includes instruction in general studies, biomedical sciences, dental sciences, clinical sciences, and clinical practice. A combination of lecture, laboratory, and clinical experiences provide students with knowledge in infection/hazard control, radiography, dental materials, preventive dentistry, and clinical procedures.

Graduates may be eligible to take the Dental Assisting National Board Examination to become Certified Dental Assistants. As a Dental Assistant II, defined by the Dental Laws of North Carolina, graduates work in dental offices and other related areas.

The program in dental assisting is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. The Commission is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the United States Department of Education. The Commission on Dental Accreditation can be contacted at (312) 440-4653 or at 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611.


EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (A55220)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Early Childhood Education curriculum prepares individuals to work with children from birth through eight in diverse learning environments. Students will combine learned theories with practice in actual settings with young children under the supervision of qualified teachers.

Course work includes child growth and development; physical/nutritional needs of children; care and guidance of children; and communication skills with families and children. Students will foster the cognitive/language, physical/motor, social/emotional and creative development of young children.

Graduates are prepared to plan and implement developmentally appropriate programs in early childhood settings. Employment opportunities include child development and child care programs, preschools, public and private schools, recreational centers, Head Start programs, and school-age programs.


ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY (A35220)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Electrical/Electronics Technology curriculum is designed to provide training for persons interested in the installation and maintenance of electrical/electronics system found in residential, commercial and industrial facilities.

Training, most of which is hands-on, will include such topics as AC/DC theory, basic wiring practices, digital electronics, programmable logic controllers, industrial motor controls, the National Electric Code, and other subjects as local needs require.

Graduates should qualify for a variety of jobs in the electrical/electronics field as an on-the-job trainee or apprentice, assisting in the layout, installation, and maintenance of electrical/electronic systems.

The following program is offered only at Southern Correctional Institution


FOODSERVICE TECHNOLOGY (D55250)
Certificate

The Foodservice Technology curriculum is designed to introduce students to the foodservice industry and prepare them for entry-level positions.

Courses include sanitation and safety, basic and advanced foodservice skills, baking, menu planning, and cost control. Graduates should qualify for employment as line cooks, prep cooks, or bakers in foodservice settings.


FOREST MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY (A15200)
A.A.S. Degree/Certificate

The Forest Management Technology curriculum is designed to help students acquire technical knowledge, understanding, and abilities in developing, conserving, and utilizing forest resources.

Students develop knowledge and skills in the principles and practices of forest resource management. Students will spend much of their time in field training situations where emphasis is placed on the practical application of this knowledge and skill.

Graduates should be qualified for entry into positions as forest technicians with federal, state, and private forestry enterprises. Graduates will have competence in forest protection, forest management, and forest procurement and in performing various technical tasks related to forestry.


GUNSMITHING (A30200)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Gunsmithing curriculum is designed to provide the student with the required skills needed to refurbish metal and wood as applicable to firearms, to diagnose malfunctions for repair, and to accomplish more complex custom gunsmithing tasks.

Course work includes manufacturing of tools used in the gunsmithing trade, restoration of firearms, stock making, barrel work, repair work, and custom work. The student will accomplish this work by performing actual gunsmithing tasks in a hands-on environment.

Graduates should qualify as professional gunsmiths, able to complete any task in general gunsmithing.


HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY (A45380)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Human Services Technology curriculum prepares students for entry-level positions in institutions and agencies which provide social, community, and educational services. Along with core courses, students take courses that prepare them for specialization in specific human service areas.

Students will take courses from a variety of disciplines. Emphasis in core courses is placed on development of relevant knowledge, skills, and attitudes in human services. Fieldwork experience will provide opportunities for application of knowledge and skills learned in the classroom.

Graduates should qualify for positions in mental health, child care, family services, social services, rehabilitation, correction, and educational agencies. Graduates choosing to continue their education may select from a variety of transfer programs at senior public and private institutions.


HUMAN SERVICES TECHNOLOGY / DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES (A4538A)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Human Services Technology/Developmental Disabilities concentration is designed to train technicians to work with children and adults with physical, mental, and emotional disabilities. Students will specialize in the areas of developmental disabilities and mental retardation.

Students will gain an understanding of the handicapping effects of developmental disabilities in medical, psychological, social, educational, vocational, and economic terms. Fieldwork and clinical experience in community agencies providing comprehensive services to disabled persons and their families will be provided.

Graduates should qualify for employment in group homes, foster care homes, respite services, vocational rehabilitation agencies, sheltered workshops, adult developmental activities programs, early childhood intervention programs, and other programs for individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities and their families.


INFANT/TODDLER CARE (C55290)
Certificate

The curriculum prepares individuals to work with children from infancy to three years of age in diverse learning environments. Students will combine learned theories, competency-based knowledge, and practice in actual settings with infants and toddlers.

Course work includes infant/toddler growth and development: physical/nutritional needs of infants and toddlers; safety issues in the care of infants and toddlers; care and guidance; communication skills with families and children; design an implementation of appropriate curriculum; and other related topics.

Graduates should be prepared to plan and implement developmentally appropriate infant/toddler programs in early childhood settings. Employment opportunities include child development and child care programs, preschools, public and private schools, recreational centers, Early Head Start Programs, and other infant/toddler programs.


MEDICAL ASSISTING (A45400)
A.A.S. Degree/Certificate

The Medical Assisting curriculum prepares multi-skilled health care professionals qualified to perform administrative, clinical, and laboratory procedures.

Course work includes instruction in scheduling appointments, coding, and processing insurance accounts, billing, collections, medical transcription, computer operation; assisting with examinations/treatments, performing routine laboratory procedures, electrocardiography, supervised medication administration; and ethical/legal issues associated with patient care.

Graduates of CAAHEP accredited medical assisting programs may be eligible to sit for the American Association of Medical Assistants Certification Examination to become Certified Medical Assistants. Employment opportunities include physicians' offices, health maintenance organizations, health departments, and hospitals.

Specific Admission Information: In addition to the general admission requirements for the College, Medical Assisting students must have the physical ability to reach and stand for sustained periods and must have visual acuity to determine accuracy, neatness, and thoroughness of work, as well as auditory competence and manual dexterity. Students must have documentation of passing a physical examination and Hepatitis B series before entering Lab Procedures. The series must be completed before clinical externship. Additionally, current CPR certification is required prior to the clinical externship.

Note: Clinical externships are supervised by an instructor and an on-site resource person. Students do not receive monetary compensation for their externship experience.

The Montgomery Community College Medical Assisting A.A.S. Program, Troy, NC is accredited by The Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB).

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)
1361 Park Street
Clearwater, Florida 33756
(727) 210-2350
www.caahep.org

Medical Assisting Education Review Board (MAERB)
20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 1575
Chicago, Illinois 60606
(800) 228-2262
www.maerb.org


METAL ENGRAVING (D30240)
Diploma/Certificate

The Metal Engraving curriculum is designed to train students in eye-hand coordination, artistic vision, and the technology necessary in occupations involving the embellishment of metals.

Course work will include embellishments utilizing the hammer and chisel, power engraving devices, acid etching, the inlaying of precious metals and jewels into a metal base, bas-relief graving, and the sinking of scenes into the medium.

Graduates should be able to apply the acquired skills in occupations requiring sound bench work skills. Such occupations might include gold and/or silver smithing, gunsmithing, the tool and die trades, printing plates, and jewelry.


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION (A25370)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Office Administration curriculum prepares individuals for positions in administrative support careers. It equips office professionals to respond to the demands of a dynamic computerized workplace.

Students will complete courses designed to develop proficiency in the use of integrated software, oral and written communication, analysis and coordination of office duties and systems, and other support topics. Emphasis is placed on non-technical as well as technical skills.

Graduates should qualify for employment in a variety of positions in business, government, and industry. Job classifications range from entry-level to supervisor to middle management.


OFFICE ADMINISTRATION: LEGAL CONCENTRATION (A2537A)
A.A.S. Degree

The Legal is a concentration under the curriculum title of Office Administration. This curriculum prepares individuals for entry-level positions in legal or government-related offices and provides professional development for the currently employed.

Course work includes terminology, operational procedures, preparation and transcription of documents, computer software, and court-related functions as they relate to the legal office profession. Emphasis is placed on the development of accuracy, organizational skills, discretion, and professionalism.

Graduates should qualify for employment in corporate legal departments; private practices, including real estate and estate planning; and city, state, and federal government offices. With appropriate work experience, graduates may apply for certification as a Professional Legal Secretary (PLS).


PRACTICAL NURSING (D45660)
Diploma

The Practical Nursing curriculum prepares individuals with the knowledge and skills to provide nursing care to children and adults. Students will participate in assessment, planning, implementing, and evaluating nursing care.

Graduates are eligible to apply to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-PN) which is required for practice as a Licensed Practical Nurse. Employment opportunities include hospitals, rehabilitation/long term care/home health facilities, clinics, and physicians' offices.

Specific Admission Information: The application and testing deadline is October 15 for the upcoming Fall Semester Program.

Note: Clinical experiences in the Practical Nursing Program are supervised by an instructor and/or an on-site resource person. Students do not receive monetary compensation for their clinical experience.


PROFESSIONAL CRAFTS: CLAY (A30300)
A.A.S. Degree/Diploma/Certificate

The Professional Crafts: Clay curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for employment as professional potters in pottery related fields. Using traditional and contemporary concepts, instruction includes technical knowledge, design skills, and marketing and business essentials.

Course work includes development of basic and advanced throwing skills with emphasis on form and design. Study will include pottery studio and marketing procedures.

Graduates will be able to open and operate their own pottery business or work for existing pottery businesses.


SCHOOL AGE CARE (C55450)
Certificate

This curriculum prepares individuals to work with school-age children in diverse learning environments. The curriculum is specifically designed for students planning to work in public or private school-age care environments.

Course work includes child growth/development; physical/nutritional needs of school-age children; care and guidance of school-age children; and communication skills with parents and children. Students will foster the cognitive/language, physical/motor, social/emotional, and creative development of school-age populations.

Graduates are prepared to plan and implement developmentally appropriate activities in school-age environments. Employment opportunities include school-age teaching or school-age administration positions in child care/development programs, group leaders, before and after school programs, recreational centers and other programs that work with school-age populations.


TAXIDERMY (D30380)
Diploma/Certificate

The Taxidermy curriculum is designed to develop skills while teaching preservation of birds, fish, game heads and mammals. Related subjects are included for a better understanding of customer relations and natural habitat construction. Students are also versed in state/federal regulations.

Course work includes basic proper measuring, skinning, fleshing, preserving, form selection and preparation. Students will learn basic mounting procedures, finishing and painting of selected specimens. Students will learn how to construct natural habitats and the artistic display of mounted items.

Opportunities exist for graduates to set up their own business. Job opportunities are found in conjunction with sports shops, game preserves, museums, art galleries, interior decorators plus guides and outfitters. Graduates will qualify for North Carolina and Federal Taxidermy licenses.

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Administration

Faculty and Staff

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 Revised August 12, 2014

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